5 Most Popular Posts on WebWorkerDaily This Week

Just in case you missed any of them, here are the five most popular posts on WebWorkerDaily this week:

Aliza’s second “Social Superstar” column looks at some developments in the social space that you should pay attention to.

Amber shares her 12-step program for getting more productive

Dawn explains her two-pronged backup strategy

In Aliza’s first “Social Superstar” column, she explain ten things we need to steer clear of if social media is to avoid repeating the mistakes of the Web 1.0 era.

Constant interruptions can kill your concentration and put a crimp in your productivity. Karen shows how to fight back.

5 Most Popular Posts on WebWorkerDaily This Week

Just in case you missed any of them, here are the five most popular posts on WebWorkerDaily this week:

Doriano shares his favorite ways to get the most out of Google’s new foray into the social networking space, Buzz.

In Aliza’s first “Social Superstar” column, she explain ten things we need to steer clear of if social media is to avoid repeating the mistakes of the Web 1.0 era.

Georgina exaplins hwo we can get better connected with our social networks

Simon looks at the latest beta of Opera 10.5, and finds that its claims to be the fastest browser available really do stack up.

A new service that recently opened in Atlanta Hartsfield airport, called Minute Suites, wants to serve as travelers’ oasis from the stress of life traveling the unfriendly skies. Nancy takes it for a spin.

5 Most Popular Posts on WebWorkerDaily This Week

Just in case you missed any of them, here are the five most popular posts on WebWorkerDaily this week:

Monday was Clean Out Your Computer Day — but if you missed it, you could still follow Thursday’s tips.

A new service that recently opened in Atlanta Hartsfield airport, called Minute Suites, wants to serve as travelers’ oasis from the stress of life traveling the unfriendly skies. Nancy takes it for a spin.

Imran shares some meeting insights from Google’s Marissa Mayer

Charlie’s new productivity tip: don’t go online before breakfast.

Simon benchmarks the latest release from Opera — and finds that it really is the fastest browser on Earth (currently)

5 Most Popular Posts on WebWorkerDaily This Week

Just in case you missed any of them, here are the five most popular posts on WebWorkerDaily this week:

Paisano shares his favorite extensions for Google’s increasingly popular browser.

While Untemplater is full of interesting content, one fact about it will be especially interesting to web workers: its six founders live all over the world, in places including New Zealand, Thailand and Wisconsin. Thursday tells the story of this virtual business.

Charlie lists the Firefox add-ons that are an integral part of his workflow.

Google Docs’ simplicity doesn’t mean that it’s limited in functionality. Celine takes a closer look to find out what else we can do with this seemingly lightweight tool.

Darrell doesn’t like using Facebook, but this new Silverlight client makes the experience a lot more bearable.

Twitt Updated, Now Supports Multiple Accounts

Dan Deming-Henes has released version 1.1 of Twitt, adding a host of useful features to his his lightweight Mac (s aapl) Twitter client, which Darrell reviewed back in November. Perhaps most importantly, and addressing one of Darrell’s complaints about version 1.0, is that it now supports multiple Twitter accounts. This new version also supports Twitter’s built-in retweet functionality, and can now use yfrog for image uploading and  j.mp for URL shortening (in addition to Twitpic and bit.ly, which were available in version 1.0). Additional improvements include in-app image viewing and new keyboard shortcuts. You can get the new version for free from the Twitt web site.

Are you a Twitt user?

Who Owns Your Data?

Here on WWD, we’ve recently been discussing privacy in social media, but the issues of privacy, security and data ownership actually extend much further, affecting everything we do on the Internet. As our computing increasingly moves to the web from the desktop, more of our personal and private information — from emails and documents to financial information and even our current whereabouts — sits in the cloud. Gmail, Google Docs, Upcoming, Foursquare, Zoho, Facebook, Basecamp, Flickr, Twitter, Mozy — so much of our data is now kept online. Many people don’t stop to think about where that data is stored, or how it might be accessed or used.

So, who owns your data, and who has access to it? In my latest Long View for GigaOM Pro, “Who Owns Your Data in the Cloud?” (subscription required) I take an in-depth look at the issues of privacy, security and data ownership in the cloud; the legal protection (or lack of it) that your information has to protect it from unwanted snooping; and the steps that we should all be taking to minimize the risks of our data being accessed or used in ways that we hadn’t intended.