The Hadoop wars, HP cloud(s) and IBM’s big win

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If you are confused about Hewlett-Packard’s cloud plan of action, this week’s guest will lay it out for you. Bill Hilf, the SVP of Helion product management, makes his second appearance on the show (does that make him our Alec Baldwin?) to talk about HP’s many-clouds-one-management layer strategy.

The lineup? Helion Eucalyptus for private clouds which need Amazon Web Services API compatibility; Helion OpenStack for the rest and [company]HP[/company] Cloud Development Platform (aka Cloud Foundry) for platform as a service.  Oh and there’s HP Public Cloud which I will let him tell you about himself.

But first Derrick Harris and I are all over IBM’s purchase of AlchemyAPI, the cool deep learning startup that does stuff like identifying celebs and wanna-be celebs from their photos. It’s a win for [company]IBM [/company]because all that coolness will be sucked into Watson and expand the API set Watson can parlay for more useful work. (I mean, winning Jeopardy is not really a business model, as IBM Watson exec Mike Rhodin himself has pointed out.) 

At first glance it might seem that a system that can tell the difference between Will Ferrell and Chad Smith might be similarly narrow, but after consideration you can see how that fine-grained, self-teaching technology could find broader uses.

AlchemyAPI CEO Elliot Turner and IBM Watson sales chief Stephen Gold shared the stage at Structure Data last year. Who knows what deals might be spawned at this year’s event?

Celebrity_ChadSmith_WillFerrell_cropped

Also we’re happy to follow the escalating smack talk in the Hadoop arena as Cloudera CEO Tom Reilly this week declared victory over the new [company]Hortonworks[/company]-IBM-Pivotal-backed Open Data Platform effort which we’re now fondly referring to as the ABC or “Anyone But Cloudera” alliance.

It’s a lively show so have a listen and (hopefully) enjoy.

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Hosts: Barb Darrow, Derrick Harris and Jonathan Vanian

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Mark Cuban on net neutrality: the FCC can’t protect competition. 

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IBM acquires deep learning startup AlchemyAPI

So much for AlchemyAPI CEO Elliot Turner’s statement that his company is not for sale. IBM has bought the Denver-based deep learning startup that delivers a wide variety of text analysis and image recognition capabilities via API.

IBM plans to integrate AlchemyAPI’s technology into the core Watson cognitive computing platform. IBM will also use AlchemyAPI’s technology to expand its set of Watson cloud APIs that let developers infuse their web and mobile applications with artificial intelligence. Eventually, the AlchemyAPI service will shut down as the capabilities are folded into the IBM Bluemix platform, said IBM Watson Group vice president and CMO Stephen Gold said.

Elliot Turner — CEO, AlchemyAPI; Stephen Gold, Watson Solutions, IBM Software Group. Structure Data 2014

Love at first sight? AlchemyAPI CEO Elliot Turner (left) and IBM Watson vice president Stephen Gold (center) at Structure Data 2014.

Compared with Watson’s primary ability to draw connections and learn from analyzing textual data, AlchemyAPI excels at analyzing text for sentiment, category and keywords, and for recognizing objects and faces in images. Gold called the two platforms “a leather shoe fit” in terms of how well they complement each other. Apart from the APIs, he said AlchemyAPI’s expertise in unsupervised and semi-supervised learning systems (that is, little human oversight over model creation) will be a good addition to the IBM team.

We will discuss the burgeoning field of new artificial intelligence applications at our Structure Data conference later this month in New York, as well as at our inaugural Structure Intelligence event in September.

I have written before that cloud computing will be the key to IBM deriving the types of profits it wants to from Watson, as cloud developers are the new growth area for technology vendors. Cloud developers might not result in multi-million-dollar deals, but they represent a huge user base in aggregate and, more importantly, can demonstrate the capabilities of a platform like Watson probably better than IBM itself can. AlchemyAPI already has more than 40,000 developers on its platform.

Other companies delivering some degree of artificial intelligence and deep learning via the cloud, and sometimes via API, include Microsoft, Google, MetaMind, Clarifai and Expect Labs.

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AlchemyAPI’s facial recognition API can distinguish between Will Ferrell and Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Chad Smith.

AlchemyAPI’s Turner said his company decided to join IBM, after spurning numerous acquisition offers and stating it wasn’t for sale, in part because it represents an opportunity to “throw rocket fuel on” the company’s long-term goals. Had the plan been to buy AlchemyAPI, kill its service and fold the team into research roles — like what happens with so many other acquisitions of deep learning talent — it probably would not have happened.

Gold added that IBM is not only keeping the AlchemyAPI services alive (albeit as part of the Bluemix platform) but also plans to use the company’s Denver headquarters as the starting point of an AI and deep learning hub in the city.

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Update: This post was updated at 9:10 a.m. to include quotes and information from Elliot Turner and Stephen Gold.

AlchemyAPI points its deep learning service on ad inventory

AlchemyAPI has released a new deep-learning-based API it says can automatically categorize content into inventory suitable for targeted advertising. It’s among a handful of improvements to AlchemyAPI’s service and in the deep learning space, in general.