Uber banned in Spain & Thailand, sued in Portland, hassled in Rio

On Tuesday, both Thailand and Spain banned Uber. You know the drill by now: The company’s drivers don’t have taxi permits and/or insurance, and the authorities have had an earful from furious cab drivers who do have to pay for such things. Yesterday it was authorities in Delhi that told the firm to stop operating locally, after an Uber driver allegedly raped a passenger. Meanwhile, the cities of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil, and Portland, Oregon, have also told the firm to stay off the roads (via police complaint and lawsuit respectively), and an Uber driver in San Francisco has been charged with misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter for driving over and killing a six-year-old girl.

Uber banned in Delhi after alleged rape by driver

Local authorities in the Indian city of Delhi have banned Uber, following the alleged rape of a woman there by an Uber driver. According to the Economic Times of India, the Delhi Transport Commission says Uber’s drivers are offering point-to-point taxi services without the correct licence.

“In this rape case, the victim was provided an All India Permit Taxi which is not allowed to ferry customers point-to-point in the national capital,” transport department commissioner Satish Mathur told the newspaper on Monday. “Uber is not an authorized radio cab service and has been operating illegally.”

According to the piece, the driver was at the time of the incident out on bail, after being arrested over the rape of another passenger in 2011.

Uber chief Travis Kalanick said in a Sunday statement that “what happened over the weekend in New Delhi is horrific” and the company would “do everything, I repeat, everything to help bring this perpetrator to justice and to support the victim and her family in her recovery.”

“We will work with the government to establish clear background checks currently absent in their commercial transportation licensing programs. We will also partner closely with the groups who are leading the way on women’s safety here in New Delhi and around the country and invest in technology advances to help make New Delhi a safer city for women,” Kalanick said.

Meanwhile, a ban on one of Uber’s services has been upheld in the Netherlands. A court in The Hague ruled on Monday that the UberPop “ride-sharing” service was breaking the law because, while it is presented as a carpooling service, its drivers are charging a fee and therefore need a taxi license.

Despite the fact that UberPop drivers face €10,000 ($12,265) fines if they are caught — and indeed, four have already been fined — Uber has promised that it will continue running the service. This is in keeping with the company’s regular encouragement of people to break laws it does not agree with, with no promise that it will pay their fines. Uber itself now faces a €100,000 fine for continuing to run UberPop in the Netherlands.

Uber is also uging drivers to risk fines in the U.S. city of Portland, Oregon, which has declared the service illegal, and in many other cities around the world. Last week Kalanick said in a blog post that he was eager for Uber to become a “more humble company.”

German Uber driver caught out as ban gets personal

You can only flout a ban so far before the authorities are forced to do something. The driver escaped a fine this time but could be on the hook for as much as $323,000 if he does it again.

Australian court lifts ban on Galaxy Tab

The injunction previously won by Apple in Australia against the sale of Samsung’s Galaxy Tab has been overturned Tuesday as the result of a Federal Court appeal. The temporary injunction was unanimously ruled against by the court’s panel of judges, and will end Friday.

ITC staff: HTC Android ban not against public interest

The legal battle Apple is waging against Android could become one of Steve Jobs’ most influential legacies, and a new statement from the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) supporting Apple’s stance might prove a key victory for the company in that ongoing fight.