Chromebook sales still on the rise

The latest figures from NPD, by way of BetaNews, show that Google Chromebooks are continuing to sell well in the U.S. The research firm estimates that in 2014 Chromebooks accounted for 14 percent of all laptop sales for both the commercial and retail channels; up 85 percent from 2013. The former market accounted for the bulk of those sales as Chrome OS is finding a home in the classroom.

On this week’s Chrome Show, we discussed the numbers and pointed out details of Dell’s latest Chromebook which is specifically aimed at education with a few unique features that students and teachers should like. We also recap everything we know — and don’t yet know —  about the upcoming [company]Google[/company] Chromebook Pixel refresh. Tune in below or download this week’s podcast here.

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Chromebooks can now run Linux in a Chrome OS window

This is cool: Chromebook users can now run their favorite Linux distribution within a window right on their Chrome OS desktop. Google’s own happiness evangelist François Beaufort revealed with a Google+ post Tuesday that Chromebook oners who have set their device in developer mode can download special Crouton Chrome extension to run Linux without being forced to switch back and forth between the two operating systems.

Screenshot 2014-12-29 at 11.09.09 AM

Running Linux on a Chromebook is not a new thing. Chrome OS is based on the Linux kernel, and there are a number of ways to run both Chrome OS and Linux on the device. My colleague Kevin Tofel highlighted three ways of accessing Linux (and other operating systems as well) a while back, and he even recorded a video of using Crouton to run Chrome OS and Linux simultaneously, which you can watch below. However, the new Crouton Chrome extension makes it possible for the first time to run Linux in a window.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v031udlfY5E]