Report: Why the Mac is infiltrating the enterprise

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Why the Mac is infiltrating the enterprise by Erica Ogg:
Traditionally, the Mac has made up an extremely small sliver of corporate PC purchases, but over the last few quarters, more and more of them have been incorporated into the workplace. And on the heels of this trend was an announcement from the analysts over at Forrester last month: Businesses should start buying Macs for their employees. Or at any rate, they should at least start allowing employees to bring one, even if it’s their own, to work. Specifically, Forrester called the “prohibition” against Apple desktops and laptops on corporate networks outdated and said it needed to be “repealed.” And that represents a major opportunity for Apple.
To read the full report click here.

Today in Mobile

There are plenty of stories coming out of Nokia’s much-anticipated introduction of the Lumia 920 this morning, so I’ll use this space to direct your attention to some compelling new data from comScore regarding the upcoming iPhone. As Mobile Marketing Watch reports, the vast majority of owners of recent iPhones are planning to buy Apple’s newest handset, and substantial percentages of Android and BlackBerry owners plan to switch. Meanwhile, a hefty 32 percent of users who don’t yet own a smartphone are eyeing the new iPhone. And Apple has grown its market share in recent months even without producing a new handset. All these signs point to huge sales for the upcoming iPhone, which is slated to be announced next week.

Today in Connected Consumer

Seems you can introduce a connected device these days without an accompanying announcement about a new, bundled content service. As Nokia prepares to unveil its first Windows Phone 8 handsets, the phonemaker announced Tuesday that will try again with a comes-with-music strategy, bundling its WinPhone 8 devices with an ad- and subscription-free streaming music service. Nokia had previously tried to stand up a paid music service for its phones but shut down that effort in 2011. Meanwhile, Amazon prepared the ground today for the expected unveiling of a new Kindle Fire on Thursday by announcing a new deal with EPIX to add Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM films to Amazon’s Prime Instant Video service, which comes bundled with Kindle tablets. And in Variety, Brian Lowry wonders if and when Apple will start bundling its own content subscription services with its devices.

Today in Mobile

The fallout continues this morning following Friday night’s judgment in the big patent case between Apple and Samsung: Samsung shares were down 7 percent after the jury awarded Apple more than $1 billion, while the iPhone maker saw its shares reach an all-time high. The judgment doesn’t spell doom for Samsung or Android in general, and we’re likely to see appeals that could take months (or even years) to play out. The verdict could give Microsoft’s Windows Phone a lift, as Computerworld points out, but it’s tough to overstate how big a win this is for Apple. Regardless of what you think of the U.S. patent system — and I think it’s a mess — Apple is likely to continue to use its intellectual property to wage war against Android in the patent courts.

Today in Mobile

Apple and Samsung must stop selling some of their gadgets in South Korea, Bloomberg reports, after a Seoul court found the two companies infringed on each other’s patents. Apple was found to have violated two Samsung patents regarding the transmission of mobile data, while Samsung violated an Apple patent regarding a touchscreen feature. This ruling alone won’t have a tremendous impact, as it doesn’t apply to recent products from either company. But it’s a timely reminder that while many of us are focused on the U.S. patent trial between the two, there are countless patent squabbles in tech going on all over the world.

Today in Connected Consumer

As summer fades and fall beckons, new-product season is almost upon us. And as has become tradition in recent years, everyone is scrambling for their moment in the sun before Apple blocks out the sun. Apple is unofficially expected to hold an event September 12, and the rumors say the iPhone 5 and iPad Mini are on tap. Other rumors say the September 12 event will be iPhone-only, however, and that Apple will hold a second event in October to unveil the iPad Mini. Microsoft, Nokia, Samsung and Amazon are taking no chances, however, squeezing in events on September 5 and 6 in hopes of getting at least a week’s worth of buzz for whatever they have planned.

Today in Connected Consumer

Connected TVs and over-the-top streaming don’t have to mean lost advertising revenue for content owners and could even create new advertising opportunities, according to a new report by Frank Magid Associates and commissioned by digital ad network YuMe. A national survey of connected TV users found a marked preference for ad-supported content over paid, ad-free content. Moreover 90 percent of viewers say they notice the ads in OTT streams and two-thirds say they are “likely” to interact with them. Even if that’s over-stated it’s an impressive number. Meanwhile, Fortune contributor Nigam Arora dives into the Apple TV 2.0 patent I discussed in my latest Weekly Update to uncover this nugget: a method for replacing ads in broadcast streams with locally cached ads on the fly. While Arora suggests it could be used to replace ads inserted by broadcasters with ads from third-party sources, I suspect it has more to do with giving the networks a way to target individual Apple TV users based on various metrics collected by Apple. That would be more of a win-win.

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