D-Wave Systems raises $30M to keep commercializing its quantum computer

D-Wave Systems has raised $30 million to continue improving a technology that the company claims is the first commercial quantum computer. Debate over its quantum properties persist, but the company is working on things that could pay off regardless how the system is ultimately labeled.

Startups building quantum computing apps for cancer research, financial services

DNA-SEQ and 1QBit, two startups working on cancer research and financial modeling, respectively, have partnered with quantum computer manufacturer D-Wave Systems to try and develop applications that can run on the latter’s system. Last month, a company called Aerospace Concepts announced its plans to develop quantum computing software targeting advanced systems design. Debate over D-Wave’s technology aside, attempts to build quantum software targeting specific industries are meaningful. If they’re eventually proven effective, such applications will presumably lower barriers to adoption (e.g., how to use them and when) that often accompany new technologies.

Get ready for a quantum computing software company

An Australian company called Aerospace Concepts is partnering with Lockheed Martin to perform research on its quantum computer that could result in the world’s first quantum computing software company. Aerospace Concepts specializes in complex system design, a presumably strong use case for quantum computing.

Study validates the quantum properties of D-Wave’s computer

A new study might help confirm that D-Wave Systems’ quantum computer chip might actually be what it claims to be. Conducted at the University of Southern California, where the D-Wave system owned by aerospace contractor Lockheed Martin is based, a team of scientists has concluded that the 128-qubit processor “behaved in a way that agrees with a model called ‘quantum Monte Carlo,’ yet disagreed with two candidate classical models.” In two weeks at our Structure Data conference, D-Wave CEO Vern Brownell will talk about what quantum computers can do and how they’ll be available as cloud services.