MongoDB adds paid support for its free software

By offering users of its free software the same support it offers users of its paid software, MongoDB is actually making a pretty bold statement. As competitors encroach on its turf and IPO demands ramp up, the company is doubling down on its open source foundation.

SQL-on-Hadoop startup Splice Machine adds $3M in funding

Splice Machine, a San Francisco-based startup promising to turn HBase into a relational database that can even handle transactional workloads, has added $3 million to its series B round of venture capital. Correlation Ventures led the latest cash infusion, which is in addition to the $15 million that Interwest Partners and Mohr Davidow Ventures invested into Splice Machine in February. The SQL-on-Hadoop space hasn’t been too good to startups (see, e.g., the fates of Hadapt, Drawn to Scale and even Karmasphere) but perhaps Splice Machine, which has the advantage operating in a more-mature Hadoop market, will be an exception.

Even Palantir can’t ignore the cult of simplicity

Palantir has a customer base that pays for results, but the company nonetheless attributes puts a lot of effort into user experience. In June, it re-architected its database simplicity in mind; on Thursday, it acquired a startup doing drag-and-drop mobile app development.

Cloudera and MongoDB enter into a deep product partnership

Cloudera and MongoDB have formed a partnership that could potentially span everything from integrations to new products. It’s a big bet by MongoDB that Cloudera will be the Hadoop distribution of choice for its users, and another way for Cloudera to distinguish itself from Hadoop peers.

DataStax takes Cassandra in-memory

NoSQL startup DataStax announced on Wednesday that it has added an in-memory option to its commercial version of the Cassandra key-value database. Cassandra is seeing an uptick in adoption right now because of its scalability and ability to span data centers, and the ability to serve data from memory instead of disk will make it a lot faster, too. If the approaches of startups like DataStax, MemSQL and others are any indication, it looks like databases of the future will feature broad ranges of capabilities, data formats and storage options.