Facebook’s new acquisition should make its videos look better

Facebook is doubling down on video. After publishing its latest video metrics Wednesday, which show staggering growth, the company announced its purchase of QuickFire Networks Thursday.

QuickFire, not exactly a household name, cuts down the amount of bandwidth needed to stream video online, but keeps the quality of the image high. And that’s exactly what it will be doing at Facebook, powering the company’s increasing amount of video content, both in advertising and from its content partners. As Bloomberg pointed out, this will be useful for Facebook push into the developing world where the service’s users might not have as good of internet service.

At the moment, 1 billion videos are viewed a day on average on the social network, which is nearly one for every 1.35 billion Facebook users. Across the world, each person on Facebook posts an average of 75 percent more videos than they did a year ago. In the United States alone that number jumps to 94 percent. And across the world, 65 percent of that video consumption is happening on mobile. Facebook’s need for cutting edge video streaming technology will only increase as this trend continues.

From QuickFire’s announcement about the acquisition, it sounds like some members of the team will move on while others will join Facebook.

Facebook is considering adding a type of “dislike” button

On Thursday, Facebook held its second ever public Town Hall (here’s our coverage of the first). It’s a chance for Facebook users to ask CEO Mark Zuckerberg about the product, the company and his vision. Here are the highlights:

The dislike button

Facebook is thinking about introducing a type of “dislike” button, but it’s not sold on the idea. Zuckerberg said the company has been considering new variations on the like button for some time.

“There are more sentiments people want to express than just positivity,” Zuckerberg said. When people share moments that are sad or controversial, there isn’t a quick, easy way to empathize with them. “People tell us they aren’t comfortable pressing ‘like’ when someone lost a loved one,” Zuckerberg offered as an example.

However, don’t expect the company to roll out a “dislike” button right away. Some people have asked Facebook for a dislike button so they can express negativity. “We don’t think that’s good for the world,” Zuckerberg said. “We’re not going to build that.”

Instead, Facebook is going to figure out ways to express other sentiments besides just positivity.

Getting silly with it

The rest of the Q & A carried on with a mix of quirky and compelling questions.

Several got big laughs from the audience. One woman wanted to know Zuckerberg’s favorite pizza toppings. (“If you’re going to be eating pizza you might as well have fried chicken on top.”) Another asked him, “If we were married, how would you handle Facebook with our daughter?” (Leniently.) A third thanked him for driving up the price of her home with the Facebook campus. (“That’s the first time anyone has ever thanked me for having Facebook raise housing prices!”)

Was Zuckerberg not told about the emotions study?

On a more serious note, Zuckerberg addressed the emotions testing study that garnered Facebook a lot of criticism earlier this year. He implied, but didn’t outright state, that he wasn’t told about the experiment beforehand. “Anything that might affect how you share stuff, that’s something I should know about,” Zuckerberg said. “The way we did it, I think we could have done it a lot better.” He went on to explain that in the future Facebook will have systems to ensure “the right people within the company know about it” and “can decide whether it’s an appropriate or right thing to be testing.”

Graph search

The last piece of product news Zuckerberg shared was around Graph Search. The company wants to roll it out in different languages and other parts of the world, but it has struggled in developing the product. “It’s a lot of work — there are so many different posts on Facebook,” Zuckerberg said. “I think there’s a trillion posts.” Since Graph Search must comb them all to serve relevant answers, it’s a huge undertaking. Zuckerberg admitted that Facebook hasn’t made it easy for the community to tap into its network’s knowledge, whether around places, restaurants, movies or more.

“I’m an impatient person so it’s taking longer than I want to roll out search in other parts of the world,” he said. “We hope to deliver this sometime soon.”

This post was updated with more details as the Q & A unfolded.