With Sony’s ePub Move, Adobe Wins

smallreaderSony’s announcement today that it’s throwing open the doors of its e-book store and reading devices to the ePub standard is certainly good news for consumers. ePub — and open standard developed by the International Digital Publishing Form — is already supported by a growing number of major publishers and a growing number of reading devices. With Sony on board, consumers will have greater flexibility over how they buy and read e-books.
The move is also clearly a bid by Sony to establish itself as the No. 2 in the e-book market behind Amazon’s Kindle before the Barnes & Noble/Plastic Logic alliance comes fully online next year. But the big winner in today’s announcement is Adobe Systems (s ADBE). Read More about With Sony’s ePub Move, Adobe Wins

Apple Bringing Down the Axe On Aggregators, e-Books and e-Readers

tab-freerssreader

Normally, Apple (s aapl) removes apps from the App Store at a rate we can digest and analyze, but it looks like it’s now adopting a different tactic, maybe to frustrate criticism with sheer volume. This time around, it has given the boot to a stunning 900 apps in one fell swoop. The apps aggregated various web content, and charged $4.99 for the service, despite not being copyright holders of any of it.

The app’s developer, a company called Perfect Acumen owned by one Khalid Shalik, employed 26 Indian and Pakistani programmers who churned out 943 apps last year alone. The purpose of all of the apps was to grab content tailored to a specific target audience and just display it on the iPhone. Even this simple task it didn’t handle very well, according to user reviews, which mainly criticized the app, and worse still, Perfect Acumen held no copyrights for any of the content they republished, including photos of hot celebrities, which tend to catch the attention of fair-use publication enforcers. Read More about Apple Bringing Down the Axe On Aggregators, e-Books and e-Readers

Amazon Needs to Make the Kindle Available Beyond Amazon.com: Report

earths-biggest-selection-450px._V251249388_Amazon (s amzn) will need to start selling the Kindle through venues other than just the Amazon.com web site if it wants to maintain its lead in the U.S. e-reader market, according to a new study from Forrester Research. For while the vast majority of current e-reader owners are what the research firm calls “older male tech optimists who tend to buy books online,” future potential customers will consist of a dramatically different demographic.
Read More about Amazon Needs to Make the Kindle Available Beyond Amazon.com: Report