Report: Hybrid application design: balancing cloud-based and edge-based mobile data

Our library of 1700 research reports is available only to our subscribers. We occasionally release ones for our larger audience to benefit from. This is one such report. If you would like access to our entire library, please subscribe here. Subscribers will have access to our 2017 editorial calendar, archived reports and video coverage from our 2016 and 2017 events.
Data - generic
Hybrid application design: balancing cloud-based and edge-based mobile data by Rich Morrow:
We’re now seeing an explosion in the number and types of devices, the number of mobile users, and the number of mobile applications, but the most impactful long-term changes in the mobile space will occur in mobile data as users increasingly interact with larger volumes and varieties of data on their devices. More powerful devices, better data-sync capabilities, and peer-to-peer device communications are dramatically impacting what users expect from their apps and which technologies developers will need to utilize to meet those expectations.
As this report will demonstrate, the rules are changing quickly, but the good news is that, because of more cross-platform tools like Xamarin and database-sync capabilities, the game is getting easier to play.
To read the full report, click here.

The Kindle Paperwhite quietly gets a hardware update with doubled internal storage

Buying a Kindle Paperwhite? Make sure you get the latest model — which is identical to the version released last year, except with doubled internal storage. As pointed out by Nate Hoffelder at The Digital Reader, the international product page for the Wi-Fi Kindle Paperwhite started sporting a banner earlier this summer pointing to a “current version” product page. Kindle fans on the MobileRead forums have confirmed the new page is for a 4GB Paperwhite, which was previously only available in Japan. Amazon told TechCrunch that this isn’t a new product — it’s the old Paperwhite, but with more storage.

Gadgets could take to the skies in Europe too, following U.S. rule change

Finally! Now that the FAA over in the U.S. has greenlit the use of electronic devices during all flight stages, the same may soon happen in Europe.

According to a report in The Guardian on Friday, the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) is set to take the matter to European regulators, with the hope of a decision being made within months. As in the U.S., each airline would need to seek permission individually, proving that its aircraft won’t be affected by the use of phones (with the cellular component turned off), tablets, e-readers and so forth.