Google Chrome Makes Friends With Real

Apparently people still download Real Player, because Google (s goog) is choosing to bundle its Google Chrome browser with the multimedia player. And while I personally don’t download any “software bundles,” I can’t blame Google for friending Real Networks (s RNWK). Google has been desperately trying to promote its new browser, which still has just over 1 percent of the total browser market share and is available only on Windows platforms. It has competition from the new Safari 4.0, which is not only fast but is available on both Macs and PCs. (Related: Browser wars: Opera Says It’s Not Down or Out.)

Who Says Flock Switching to Chrome? Not Flock

Update: OStatic talks to Flock CEO Shawn Hardin who says that the company “will continue to make architectural decisions that balance what’s best for our users and what’s best for Flock as a business.”

Flock, the four-year-old Redwood City, Calif.-based browser maker, according to a report in TechCrunch today is said to be making a switch to Google’s (s goog) Chrome (actually Chromium) from Mozilla Firefox.

However, a senior Flock employee says that it is not the case. “No, we haven’t switched. We’ve looked at it, just as we’ve looked at Mozilla 2, and will look at whatever else is promising,” is how Flock employee and director of engineering technology Matthew Willis described the situation in a tweet. Willis in the past had worked on Mozilla’s calendar efforts, Sunbird and Lightning. [digg=http://digg.com/tech_news/Flock_Says_It_Hasn_t_Switched_to_Google_Chrome_From_Firefox]

My sources say that towards the end of 2008, Flock devoted a single person to work on an experimental version of its browser using Chromium as a back end instead of Firefox. But why would Flock be interested in Chrome? Read More about Who Says Flock Switching to Chrome? Not Flock

Browser Wars: Opera Says It’s Not Down or Out

Economic malaise aside, consumers increasingly want to surf the Net on phones, according to Jon S. von Tetzchner, CEO of the Opera Software. “There is a mega-trend of increased Internet usage,” he told me over breakfast this morning, “and we are in the middle of it, regardless of the economic downturn.”

Is It Time to Buy Google Shares?

Google shares recently fell as much as 67 percent from an all-time high in November of 2007. But while there is plenty of reason for concern in the short term, there are also signs that Google is growing slowly more integrated into many facets of our online experiences. So does that mean it’s time to buy Google shares?

Google Chrome: One Month Later

A month after its launch, Google’s much talked about browser, Chrome seems to have seen a slow decline in usage according to some reports. It now accounts for 5.6% of all visits to this blog, though the number varies for our other blogs, indicating that Chrome is still an early adopter phenomenon.

What Netscape’s Founder Thinks About the New Google Browser

Marc Andreessen, whose first startup, Netscape Communications, introduced the consumer web to millions thanks to its Netscape browser, seems to be suitably impressed by Google’s recently released Chrome browser. He waxed eloquent about Chrome during an onstage conversation with Portfolio magazine contributing editor Kevin Maney at The Churchill Club in Palo Alto, Calif. “Any desktop application that has not been implemented in the browser is now going to be implemented in the browser,” Andreessen said. It was an idea he had espoused over a decade ago.

Read More about What Netscape’s Founder Thinks About the New Google Browser

Google Chrome-Induced Déjà Vu

With all the hype and excitement surrounding the release of Google Chrome yesterday, I, like so many, was eager to try the browser out for myself. What I didn’t expect was the overwhelming sense of déjà vu it would trigger in me.

Firefox 3: Good PR, Poor Execution

The launch of the final version of the Firefox 3 browser is not going the way Mozilla planned. This was supposed to be Download Day — an attempt to set a Guinness World Record for the most software downloaded in a 24-hour period. Instead, after the browser was pre-announced to arrive at 10 am PST, all of Mozilla’s download sites are down. For full coverage of the PR vs. the reality, check out OStatic.