Here’s what Facebook wants to do with 1,200 more employees

Facebook is growing its head count by as much as 14 percent according to a new Reuters report. It has 1,200 open job listings on its website, mostly for virtual reality roles with Oculus Rift. It’s also hiring for its drones, data centers, and Atlas advertising efforts. None of the roles mentioned by Reuters support Facebook’s core business: Its social media application. Facebook is pulling a Google, expanding into new industries to protect itself.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg placed a sizeable bet that virtual reality will be the next big thing in mobile computing when he bought Oculus Rift for $2 billion in March last year. That’s exactly what he told media, explaining, “When you put on the goggles, it’s different from anything I have ever experienced in my life.” Oculus has stayed pretty quiet since coming under Facebook’s purview, but Reuters analysts suspect the big staff up in positions like logistics and global supply management mean the company is getting ready to launch to the public.

If you don’t follow the company closely, you might be confused at the positions Facebook is hiring for to support its drone technology development: Roles like thermal engineering and aircraft electronics. Remember Internet.org, Facebook’s big ambitious project to bring Internet connections to parts of the developing world? That’s what it hopes to use drones for, and it needs people with expertise in these areas to make that happen. If Internet.org succeeds it will ultimately benefit Facebook. Reliable, fast internet in more parts of the world — the two thirds of the population currently without Internet — likely means far more Facebook (and WhatsApp and Instagram) users.

In the last few years, Facebook has moved quickly and deftly into these new business endeavors, not content to rest on its cooling social media laurels. It has grown largely through acquisition, snapping up separate, independent companies and product like Oculus, Atlas Ad Server, WhatsApp, and Instagram, instead of trying to build them from scratch. CEO Mark Zuckerberg is investing in Facebook’s future stability and growth, a smart move given the fact that its core social product has faded in relevance with younger populations. Eventually teens grow up and become the new adults, slowly decreasing Facebook’s power over time.

It needed to diversify to ensure its future.

 

 

 

Medium hires its first head of content advertising

Medium has hired someone to develop its native advertising partnerships, the first such role for the company. As Mathew Ingram previously reported, the blog company is expanding its content advertising, publishing sponsored posts that look similar to regular Medium stories. Riddhi Shah, the new hire who will oversee these efforts, will hold the title “Branded Content Lead.” (Disclosure: Shah and I interned together at The Nation four years ago.)

For Medium, bringing on its first content advertising manager is a significant move. It shows the blogging company is shifting gears, starting to prioritize revenue as it moves into its fourth year. (Medium did not respond to a request for comment sent  Thursday.)

Befitting its part publisher identity, Medium is turning to someone with a more traditional New York media background, instead of tech or business, to lead the charge. Prior to joining Medium, Shah was the Editorial Director of branded content for The Huffington Post. She worked with companies like Chipotle and TED, who advertised on particular HuffPo sections. For example, Chipotle sponsored a “Food for Thought” page as it attempted to remake itself as an environmentally and ethically conscious company.

Shah was uniquely suited for the position because she worked as a journalist for eight years prior, reporting for a variety of publications in India and the U.S. That background made it easier for her to pitch brands potential story ideas they could sponsor. Medium’s hope is that she’ll bring similar brand negotiation skills to the blogging application.

As Mathew covered, Medium wants native advertising to become a key source of funding. Even before hiring Shah, Medium already started lightly experimenting with it, launching a travel vertical called Gone, by Marriott Hotels, and a design section called Re:form, by BMW.

These stories are labeled as being “presented” by these brands, although they’re not necessarily about the companies themselves. For example, Marriott paid the expenses for Medium writers to travel to Haiti and report on the evolution of business there since the massive 2010 earthquake. You can read Mathew’s piece for a good take on the journalism ethics considerations.

From a business perspective, content advertising is well-suited for design-centric Medium. It can avoid ugly, distracting banner ads and reap more worth for brands by helping them subtly associate with certain causes or ideas.

How to hire rock stars

As a startup, you might think the A-list employees are beyond your grasp. But Scott Weiss, general partner at Andreessen Horowitz, explains why you should reach for the stars – and why they might jump at the opportunity.