Amsterdam Internet Exchange broadens its foothold in the US

The Amsterdam Internet Exchange (AMS-IX) is partnering up with Telx to establish a new internet-access point inside Telx’s NYC2 data center, according to an announcement  by the companies. The new point of presence (POP) comes just a few months after AMS-IX opened up another access point in Digital Reality’s San Francisco facility.

AMS-IX’s new POP is another step towards entrenching the European internet exchange model in the U.S. Instead of having internet service providers (ISPs) or data-center operators determine the cost structure of an internet exchange — which are basically the data-center locations where content providers, ISPs, telecoms and others link up and exchange traffic — the European internet exchange model operates a bit more like a commune in which all parties are owners and have equal say.

Advocates of this type of model claim that it hampers the ability for any specific entity, typically a telco, to monopolize the internet exchange and game the system for its advantage.

Netflix has been a big proponent of the European internet exchange model and made a splash in December 2013 when it signed on as AMS-IX’s first customer in New York. As Gigaom’s Jeff John Roberts reported, ISPs like Verizon and Comcast want to charge Netflix and content providers a premium because of the enormous amounts of network traffic they generate.

Neflix and others claim that these broadband providers have retaliated by not upgrading key internet ports, which resulted in bad network service for Netflix and other content providers.

With the new POP in Telx’s NYC2 data center, AMS-IX and Telx said that customers will now have more peering opportunities with organizations not only housed in the NYC2 data center, but also members of the Telx’s NYC1 and NYC3 data centers, which make up “The NYC Trifecta” in Manhattan, the release states.

The announcement also coincides with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler explaining in a Wired op-ed his case for settling the argument over net neutrality and which Gigaom’s Stacey Higginbotham dissected. Wheeler did not share the specifics of his plan in the Wired piece, but expect to see them emerge soon.

Reading Wheeler

Maybe Chairman Wheeler is getting ready to take a dive on net neutrality. But it’s also possible he’s laying the groundwork to defend a decision not to take a dive.

In Nashville, once over limit, Comcast will charge $10 per 50 GB

Comcast (s CMCSA) will start charging $10 per 50 GB from its broadband customers in Nashville, Tennessee, once those customers zoom past the 300 GB monthly bandwidth quota. Comcast is the latest ISP to start charging for overages. Others include Time Warner Cable, AT&T and Suddenlink