Apple services are growing, hardware slowing

Apple posted quarterly results, and received a standing ovation: the stock rose 7% at the opening this morning.
What’s intriguing is that the numbers show lower sales of iPhone (down 15% compared to last year), Mac (down 10.5%), and iPad (down 8.3%). But Apple has pulled off some hand jive, and drawn attention to what may be the future of its growth engine: services.
In the release, Luca Maestri — Apple’s CFO — wrote ‘our Services business grew 19 percent year-over-year and App Store revenue was the highest ever, as our installed base continued to grow and transacting customers hit an all-time record’.
As I mentioned earlier this week (see What’s going on in Phoneland?), the market had already priced in the negatives coming in Apple’s quarterly results. As others — like Chris O’Brien — have pointed out, Apple has done a great job managing the expectations of Wall Street, and drawing the analysts’ attention to the figures Apple wants us to pay attention to. And the trend in services, and the growing margins in iPad sales, are the figures that are causing the stock to soar.
Tim Cook stated that the services side at Apple is on track to be ‘the size of a Fortune 100 company next year’.
So, once again the maturation theme is front and center: Apple’s sales of new hardware is dropping, but with a huge installed base, what can Apple do to make money? Sell — or more aptly, rent — services to all those folks with iPhone, iPads, and Macs. (Oh, and Watches, but that’s too tiny to matter, and might never.) So if Apple can continue to grow services to the installed base — plus get some additional boost in iPhone sales in the fall when new models come out — the company will remain a Wall Street darling.
Relative to enterprise sales, the better margins in iPads has got to be a proxy for increased sales in the enterprise based on the new larger iPad Pro. But, at present, Apple doesn’t have much of a story for enterprise services. Maybe it’s time to the company to revisit the plan to buy Dropbox or Box, and replace/rework iCloud (iCloud Pro?) with a cloud file sync-and-share solution –including a deep integration with Apple’s productivity suite — that makes more sense for the enterprise?
 

Here’s what should excite you about the new iPhone 6S

Apple has released some new iPhones. They come with the company’s new operating system, are available with a new aluminum finish, and boast a bunch of the incremental upgrades that accompany every new product under the sun.
In these ways, the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus would be easy to dismiss as the same off-year product updates Apple popularized with the iPhone 4s or 5s. But these new iPhones also have features that will change how people take photos, interact with their phones, and view the concept of ownership in this new age.
Apple iPhone 6s

Cosmetic changes & improved specs

First the easy stuff. These new iPhones are available with a new Rose Gold finish, and Apple claims that it has developed new forms of aluminum and glass to make the devices more durable than their predecessors. They have updated processors, ship with iOS 9, and boast improved front-and rear-facing cameras.
iPhone 6s Live Photo

GIFs & Live Photos

Then comes the more interesting things, starting with Live Photos. These are basically animated GIFs that the new iPhones make whenever someone takes a picture. They have sound, are about three seconds long, and can be viewed by making a long press on any photo captured with these devices’ new cameras.
Automatically generating these GIFs is a nice nod to the forms dominance on the Internet. Who wants to watch a video or see a still image when an animated GIF is available? I suspect these Live Photos will be very popular — and that their popularity will be increased by the fact that services like Facebook will support them within the year, thus helping them attract all kinds of attention.
It’s hard to overstate how having Live Photos available on something like Facebook could help sell the new iPhones to many consumers. There’s nothing like good ol’ fashioned jealousy, especially where social media is concerned, to make a bunch of people want something they might have otherwise dismissed.
The interaction that allows people to view Live Photos — a long press — is part of a much larger change Apple is making to how people interact with the sheets of metal and glass that serve as windows into much of their lives. Apple is calling the upgrade 3D Touch, and horrible name aside, it’s kind of a big deal.

A screenshot showing the iPhone 6s' 3D Touch capabilities in action.

A screenshot showing the iPhone 6s’ 3D Touch capabilities in action.

3D Touch – Awful name, big addition

3D Touch is essentially bringing the concept of a right-click to the iPhone. Instead of restricting people to interacting with content shown on the screen, 3D Touch allows iPhone owners to view pertinent information or perform common tasks with little more than a long, forceful press or simple gesture.
This means things that previously required a few taps, like responding to an email or viewing flight information from a text message thread, can now be found a little more easily. It might seem like a small change, but this could make the day-to-day experience of using an iPhone less painful than before.
Features like 3D Touch and Live Photos aren’t going to make anyone want a smartphone. Hell, both of them probably sound like gobbledygook to people who aren’t already sold on animated GIFs or using smartphones every day. Instead, the features are supposed to appeal to people who already own a smartphone, whether it’s an iPhone or some Android device or another.
Apple iPhone Upgrade Program

iPhone upgrade program

That’s where the iPhone Upgrade Program comes in. Apple wants to make it easier for people to get a new iPhone every year. To do that, it’s offering unlocked devices for a monthly fee starting at $32, effectively allowing people to rent the latest-and-greatest iPhones for the 12 months between releases. Once that new device is available, consumers will be expected to turn in their old one.
It does sound tempting. But, then again, I’m also a foolish consumer who has been willing to do obscene things with his Verizon account just to get new phones whenever an old one starts showing any kind of problem, or a new one is announced with enough new features to warrant even a little excitement.
And it’s hard not to think of this as an iPhone-as-a-service play. Instead of having something you own forever, Apple is basically asking people to pay for their phones the same way they pay for their Netflix subscription. Why buy a movie when you can rent all of them? Why get an iPhone you’ll eventually replace? It’s so much more convenient to just rent one out for a little while.
That could have questionable consequences for the concept of ownership. Do we really need to rent everything we use? Wouldn’t it be nice to own some things outright instead of having everything depend on monthly payments? Those are just a few of the concerns I have about this new upgrade program.
Still, I have to hand it to Apple: the company picked the right time to introduce this new, potentially lucrative pricing structure. These new iPhones aren’t just incremental upgrades; they’re poised to change the way people use their phones or share moments from their lives. I’d pay a few bucks each month for that.

Apple’s ‘Hey Siri’ event wish list: iPad Pro, iPhone 6S, & a worthy Apple TV update

We have only a single clue ahead of next week’s Apple media event: “Hey Siri, give us a hint.”
Oh, and no shortage of rumors, whispers, and posturing.
Apple’s keynote is September 9. We expect Siri to take a starring role, with Apple incorporating its digital assistant inside new products, such as an entirely new Apple TV (that may even feature third-party apps for the first time). Pushing Siri into the limelight will become even more necessary as smartcars and smarthomes become as commonplace as smartphones.
We also know the keynote will take place in San Francisco’s Civic Auditorium, which seats 7,000. That’s huge. Toss in the fact that it’s going to be streamed not only to iOS devices but Windows 10 users as well, and we are expecting a bold, boisterous Apple — one that’s eager to reveal its intentions to be everywhere we are, and with us everywhere we go.
Expectations aside, here are all the things we’re hoping Apple will announce within new or updated products, along with the (completely unscientific) odds it will happen:
Apple Event

iPhone

Go Smaller (Odds: 25%)

iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus are a given. We also hope Apple introduces a non-phablet device, one about the dimensions of an iPhone 4S, but with the newest hardware, Touch ID, and better camera. Phablets are awesome, but they’re not for everyone.
That said, there have been no reliable reports of a new device in an old form factor.

Force Touch (Odds: 90%)

Force Touch senses how hard or light the user is touching the screen, enabling an entirely new palette of controls. Touch the screen with extra pressure to call up a secondary menu, for example, or to access a weapons cache in your favorite first-person shooter. At the very least, Force Touch will reduce the number of swipes and taps required for a specific task.
If executed properly Force Touch could even negate the need for a home button. No home button means much more screen real estate. We are not expecting this anytime soon.

Bigger Battery (Odds: 25%)

Unless you’re rocking an iPhone 6 Plus, with its massive 2,910 mAh battery, at some point during the day you’re scoping out a wall socket. It’s 2015 and this needs to stop. We wish for significantly improved battery life. Otherwise, it’s like building the world’s greatest off-road vehicle, but including only a tiny gas tank. Lots of places you could take it, but you better not.
Unfortunately, there’s been very little chatter about a larger battery.

More Speed (Odds: 90%)

A new A9 processor and more RAM seem almost certain. This means better response, improved gameplay, fewer lags, even when running Pandora or Google Maps in the background, for example.
It’s also rumored the new iPhones will include a Qualcomm chip that increases LTE download speeds from 150 Mbps to 300 Mbps. That’s a noticeable improvement. We think this will happen.

A Sharper Image (Odds: 90%)

Multiple sites have all but confirmed that the new iPhones will include a 12mp camera — a decent leap in resolution over iPhone 6’s 8mp offering.
There are also multiple reports that the front camera will get a much-deserved boost from its paltry 1.2mp to 5mp. That, plus the expected front-facing slo-mo video feature should help usher in a whole new selfie revolution — and require Instagram to purchase a lot more servers.
We are hoping for a 16mp camera, which is now standard on most premium smartphones, but we think the odds of this happening are very slight.

Apple’s take on the smartwatch: Elegant evolution

After attending the “Spring Forward” event to get all of the remaining Apple Watch details and then getting some hands-on time with the device, I walked away with mixed emotions.

Apple Watch 42mm on wrist

On the one hand, [company]Apple[/company] debuted a polished product that was very responsive in my use. On the other hand, we learned few additional features or details we didn’t already know from the September Apple Watch introduction.

The Apple Watch pricing was perhaps the biggest new piece of information. A 38 millimeter Apple Watch Sport will cost $349 while a 42 millimeter version is priced $50 more.

Apple Watch Sport Edition

The stainless steel Apple Watch starts at $549 for the smaller model and there is the same $50 premium for the larger size. Depending on your choice of band, you can spend up to $1,049. And the Apple Watch Editions made from gold will start at $10,000.

Apple Watch Edition

Aside from that, we learned a few minor details to fill in gaps. We knew, for example, the Watch would support Apple Pay but today we saw how it works. Third-party apps were shown off as extensions to what you could already do on your phone. We learned that the display of Apple Watch is off until you either raise your wrist or tap on the screen. And we saw how you could take a phone call right from the Apple Watch with its microphone and speaker.

Screen Shot 2015-03-09 at 11.14.51 AM (2)

Here’s the thing: There was no surprise or compelling feature that set the Apple Watch apart from other smartwatches, and I didn’t really see any major advancement of the device category. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, though. If you liked what you saw in the Apple Watch back in September, you got a little more to like today. If you were unconvinced back then, you’re likely still on the fence.

The situation is, to me, vastly different from another first generation product from Apple. The iPad. When the iPad arrived, it truly stood out and put Apple out in front of the tablet market. Yes, there were tablets available in the past, but none compelled the mass market uptake that iPad did.

I’m not so sure the same will hold true for the Apple Watch, at least in its first iteration.

Oh, I still expect Apple to sell millions of watches. Just not tens of millions for some time to come. Those looking for the convenience factor of not having to reach for their iPhone 100 times a day will strongly consider it. How much they will pay for that convenience is another question. I hemmed and hawed over a $249 Android Wear watch in December, for example, even with a $50 holiday discount. Spending hundreds more isn’t something I’d personally consider, but that’s just me.

Screen Shot 2015-03-09 at 10.56.57 AM (2)

As far as early comparisons between the Apple Watch and Android Wear, the functionality is much the same. There are some unique features on both, but at their core, both do similar things — notifications, health tracking and small app functionality — as they extend apps and data from a connected phone. The interfaces are different though, and overall, in my limited hands-on time, the Apple Watch appears more responsive than any Android Wear device I’ve used: fast, slick animations and quick transitions between screens.

Forrester analyst James McQuivey seems to feel the same, backing up my impressions in an email:

“Competitors will also be relieved that Apple didn’t really surprise anyone with its features. Samsung and Motorola don’t have to worry that Apple has leapfrogged them in many functional ways — the Moto 360, for example, already does most of what Apple showed today, though sometimes the user has to go looking for those features.”

Apple’s take on the smartwatch is what you’d expect then: Designed in a way that Apple feels is elegant and intuitive, just like its iPhone and iPad products. Apple Watch isn’t quite a smartwatch revolution but more of Apple’s stamp on the product category.

Apple Watch Tim cook

Perhaps the biggest difference between Apple Watch and competing products is the fashion and luxury tie-in between the different bands — which looked very nice — and gold casings. Turning a phone accessory into a luxury item purchase might be the real advancement here, and that might get people to shell out $549 or far more for a smartwatch.

Apple Watch ranges in price from $349 to over $10,000; on sale April 24

Apple answered questions about its first smartwatch at a media event in San Francisco on Monday and now we’ve got some answers on how much Apple Watch will cost and when you can buy one.

Apple Watch pricing depends on which size you get. The 38-mm Apple Watch Sport will cost $349, and the 42-mm model will cost $399. To move up to the stainless steel model, you’re going to spend at least $549, and as much as $1,049, depending on bracelet. The 42-mm models are $50 more. And for big spenders, the Apple Watch Edition with a gold case costs $10,000 and up. More information is now available on Apple’s website.

Apple Watch collection

Preorders start on April 10, and that’s when Apple will start to display them in Apple Stores. Apple Watch will go on sale on April 24 in nine countries, including China, Hong Kong, France, Japan, and the United States.

Bands, sold separately, will start at $49 for a sport band, with leather bands and a mesh bracelet coming in at $150, all the way up to Apple’s link band, which costs $449.

Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the Apple Watch during an Apple special event on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the Apple Watch during an Apple special event on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

In the absence of a unified story about what Apple Watch is best for, Apple focused on several Apple Watch features on Monday. Its first demo centered on a feature Apple called Digital Touch, which was introduced in September. It allows a user to draw on their watch and send the image to a friend’s Apple Watch — a feature that Android Wear doesn’t yet include. Users can pick up calls or reply to iMessages from an Apple Watch.

Apple Watch stand up

Apple Watch is fitness-focused, too. If you’ve been sitting too long, it will tap you and remind you to get up. For more serious athletes, Apple Watch is sporting a new workout app that tracks running, cycling, and sessions on cardio machines at your gym. It sets activity goals for you the way a coach would. These aren’t third-party features; they’re built into every Apple Watch.

Passbook gets some Apple Watch love, too. It can be used on the Apple Watch to show flight times and store QR codes. Apple Watch will work with Apple Pay for contactless retail payments.

Other features will have to be provided by third-party developers. Apple previewed apps and notifications from ESPN, CNN, Salesforce, Instagram, WeChat, Uber, Shazam, Starwood Hotels, and developers. To get those apps, you download them through the Apple Watch app on an iPhone. That feature is in the iOS 8.2 update, available today.

Uber Apple Watch app

Even if you don’t like notifications or apps on your wrist, Apple Watch has a few nifty features, like the ability to change faces based on the time of day or your location. You can control your music and use Siri as well, although Siri doesn’t talk on the Apple Watch.

Apple Watch syncs with an iPhone through both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. If you were wondering about battery life, Apple says that Apple Watch can manage an “all-day battery life across a range of activities,” which apparently means about 18 hours.

Apple Senior Vice President of Operations Jeff Williams announces ResearchKit on stage during an Apple special event on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

Apple Senior Vice President of Operations Jeff Williams announces ResearchKit on stage during an Apple special event on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

Apple launches ResearchKit to bring your data to medical research

We’re finally getting to some of the promise of connected health with the launch of ResearchKit, a framework announced at the Apple event Monday that allows medical researchers to take advantage of the data gathered by the iPhone to help advance their own diagnostics or studies of disease.

ResearchKit, like HomeKit or HealthKit, is simply a way for researchers to build applications and get data out of the iPhone that might be useful for their own purposes, but it represents a huge opportunity to make it easy to recruit people to participate in giving doctors insights about their ongoing health conditions on a regular basis, as opposed to during monthly office visits.

It also offers a chance to give patients objective tests for diseases such as Parkinson’s as opposed to subjective evaluations based on a doctor’s opinion of how a patient is able to walk. Now, for example, they could speak into their iPhone on a ResearchKit app and give objective data, or take a dexterity test based on tapping. Both were examples given by Jeff Williams, during the presentation as he showed of the first five apps built using ResearchKit that are available today.

Screen Shot 2015-03-09 at 10.21.09 AM (2)

The five apps were focused on five diseases including Parkinson’s, asthma, breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In the case of asthma, the phone would be used in conjunction with environmental tests and connected inhalers, so the GPS coordinates of the places where a person used their inhaler could be linked to the environmental tests. It’s reminiscent of what Asthmapolis does, only with an iPhone and a university.

And that’s what’s important here. I’ve seen a lot of specialized sensor efforts to gather data from patient populations, and specialized efforts to reach out to doctors and hospitals, but if ResearchKit has one thing going for it, it’s that many patients and doctors already use the primary tool they’ll need already — their iPhone. I may not like the platform because it locks people into using an iPhone to collect that data, but one of the biggest hurdles to patient’s adopting new medical technology is that it’s hard to use.

Either the patients or the doctors don’t want to learn how to use it. Downloading an app is much easier than learning how to connect a new device to your Wi-Fi network or toting around a new device. So this approach has a lot of promise. Plus, Williams stressed two really important things at the event. The first was that Apple will not see any of the user data and the second is that Apple will open source ResearchKit, making it available to all platforms.

Thus, what you have here is the beginning of what could become a widely adopted way for people to volunteer their medical data for science or to their doctor in a way that is private and could reach beyond the Apple ecosystem. If that is what comes to pass, ResearchKit might be the biggest thing Apple launches today, even counting a watch. Apple will release ResearchKit next month.

Apple debuts a thin, fanless MacBook that comes in gold

Although most of the attention at Apple’s special event on Monday will be on the Apple Watch, the company still had a little treat for Mac fans. As expected, Apple launched a 12-inch MacBook on Monday, and it will cost $1,299 or more when it starts shipping on April 10.

“We challenged ourselves to reinvent the notebook with what we’ve learned from iPhone and iPad,” CEO Tim Cook said.

macbook_overview_og

Starting, apparently, with colors. The new MacBook comes in the same colors as the iPhone and iPad: Gray, gold and silver.

This new laptop is a clear break from previous Apple laptops. Instead of Apple’s proprietary MagSafe charger, it has a single USB Type-C port, which delivers video, data and power in one, and a headphone jack. The single port shouldn’t cause too many problems when users want to plug in a device while charging: Apple says the new MacBook should be able to manage nine hours of web browsing on a single charge.

IMG_0099

Apple said its MacBook is 24 percent slimmer than the current MacBook Air line. Its length and width dimensions are close to those of the 11-inch MacBook Air. It sports a 12-inch display by slimming the extra space on both sides of the keyboard found on previous MacBooks. That 12-inch screen is a Retina display, sporting a resolution of 2304 x 1440. It’s powered by a 5-watt Intel Core M processor clocked at up to 1.3GHz, which means that the laptop doesn’t need a fan.

Phil Schiller, senior vice president of worldwide marketing, speaks during the Apple event in San Francisco on March 9, 2015.

Phil Schiller, senior vice president of worldwide marketing, speaks during the Apple event in San Francisco on March 9, 2015.

The new MacBook, simply called MacBook, sports a large trackpad using the taptic engine technology Apple is also using for its watches, and an edge-to-edge keyboard with a new mechanism that allows the laptop to be thinner. The taptic engine should enable new forms of touch interfaces, such as the ability to press harder to, say, bring up a Wikipedia entry or fast forward more quickly.

The new MacBook is apparently a new line of notebooks. It “joins” the existing MacBook Air, and MacBook Pros are getting the new upgraded taptic force trackpad as well.

Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the new MacBook during an Apple special event on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the new MacBook during an Apple special event on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

Live blog: The Apple Watch “Spring Forward” event

Announced in September, the Apple Watch is nearly here; expected to ship in April. There are still many remaining questions about the wearable and Apple is likely to answer them all at its “Spring Forward” event in San Francisco at 10am PT, Monday, March 9.

I’ll be on the scene, live-blogging the event right here, sharing more about the device’s features and pricing as the product story unfolds. It’s also possible we see other new, or updated products, such as a 12-inch MacBook Air. Tune in right here for all of the details as the event unfolds and don’t hesitate to leave your [company]Apple[/company] Watch questions in the comments; I’m sure to get some hands-on time with the newest watch that doesn’t have hands to get you some answers.

Update: Here’s what Apple announced.

Why my iPhone is the best watch I’ve ever owned

In the past, I tried my best to use Apple’s iPod Nano as a watch. Charging it each and every night, syncing it to my Mac, even strapping it to my arm with a custom watch band case. In the end everything I tried did not work out for me. Keeping in mind that it was disconnected, that experience has left me a little skeptical on how useful a smartwatch could actually be.

Since then, I’ve happily transitioned to using my iPhone as a sort of smart pocket watch. The best thing about it is that I never have to adjust my iPhone for Daylight Savings Time as it can set its own date and time.

Our smart devices constantly sync their time with various time services on the internet. No setting the clock five minutes ahead or three minutes behind to ensure you make it on time to important events. There is no longer an excuse for not knowing what time it is, right down to the second.

My iPhone is more important to me as a time piece than it is an actual phone. Here’s why.

iOS announces the time

Alarm clocks: The built-in alarm clock is rather basic but it gets the job done. You can set multiple alarms and assign a different ringtone to each one. Finding a good replacement alarm clock app is an ongoing challenge, like my quest to find a good calculator app for my iPad or a good overall weather app. There always seems to be a new app that is better than my previous favorite app. Rise Alarm Clock ($1.99, universal) is just that sort of app. It’s not just its ability to play music from my library in the morning. There is something about the way you use the clock that makes it feel like a much better clock. And being able to re-adjust your alarm wake-up time in the morning sure beats living with a standard snooze time limit.

Reminder alerts: As useful as the Rise Alarm Clock is, I’ve moved away from using the Clock app’s built-in alarm capabilities in favor of setting an alarm in the Reminder app. After creating a reminder item, clicking on the info button to the right of the reminder reveals additional settings. Setting an alarm for the reminder can not only wake you up in the morning, but also let you know what’s important to you that day.

Calendar events: It’s nice to be reminded of the time throughout the day. Calendar events are a great way to keep track of the time. Recurring events like lunch, picking up the kids from school or meeting your boss every other Wednesday for lunch are just a few examples. Adding alerts to your calendar events each day helps keep you on track.

Different alert options

Ringtones: There are several different ringtones available in iOS by default. You can set your alarm, reminder, calendar event and even the ringtone of each individual contact in your contact list to use a different alert. In the past, getting custom RingTones on your iOS device required you to sync to iTunes on your Mac or PC. Now, with Apple’s GarageBand ($4.99, universal) for iOS, you can create custom ringtones right from your iOS device without having to sync. The trick comes when you are finished editing your song. Tap the Action button and select “Share Song As Ringtone.” After the new ringtone has been exported, choose “Use Sound As” in order to associate it with one of the ringtone alert options on your device.

Vibrations: You can also use vibration alert to remind you of the time, and you can even create custom vibrations. To set an alert to a different vibration pattern go to Settings > Sounds, select the Sound and Vibration you want to customize, and tap on the Vibration setting to select which vibration pattern you want to use. If you like, you can even create your own vibration pattern by selecting Create New Vibration instead. It makes you wish you knew Morse code.

Flashing light: You can make your camera’s flash light up as part of an alert. It is one of the many useful accessibility features that everyone should know about. To use this feature go to Settings > General > Accessibility and under the Hearing section, turn on “LED Flash for Alerts.” Now each time a new notification is sent to your iPhone the camera flash will go off. Just be sure to place your iPhone face down so that the flash is pointing up and will be seen when the alarm goes off.

Siri’s voice: If you want a little more information than just a beep, bump or flash, you can have Siri read each notification to you when it displays. This feature is located under Settings > General > Accessibility > Voice Over. Scroll down to the bottom of the section and enable “Always Speak Notifications.” The trick to making this feature useful is being able to turn it on and off when you need to. This is done on the bottom of the main Accessibility section’s view. Here you will see a setting called “Accessibility Shortcut.” Set this to “Voice Over” and now every time you triple click the Home button, your iPhone will be placed in Voice Over mode and will read all of your alerts to you.

What Apple Watch does, in Tim Cook’s own words

On Monday, Apple will officially launch the Apple Watch, its first completely new product since the iPad was introduced in 2010 as well as its first major launch under CEO Tim Cook. Gigaom will be covering what Apple has in store live from the Yerba Buena Center on Monday.

But Apple actually introduced us to the Apple Watch back in September, and since then, Cook has spoken about the smartwatch several times in public. When he gets on stage in San Francisco on Monday to introduce Apple’s “most personal device ever,” some of what he’s going to cover will be new, and some of it he will have said prior, during the past six months as he’s been honing his Apple Watch pitch.

Here’s what to expect from Apple Watch, from Tim Cook, the boss of Apple himself (read it in a smooth-as-molasses southern drawl.)

On features

Apple CEO Tim Cook shows off the new iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Apple CEO Tim Cook shows off the new iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

I use mine to control my Apple TV. Another member of the team loves to use theirs as a viewfinder for their iPhone camera. Still another loves the walkie-talkie ability.

 iPhone 6 keynote, September 2014

And so I constantly use Siri with my watch, and ask different things, and all of a sudden, y’know, it’s just there. You can do things like get notifications across your watch.

And if you’re interested in keeping up with the sports score to the financial markets to whatever it is, it’s like this, the Watch knows you’re looking at it, and it comes on. If I’m not looking at it, the Watch is off.

I sit for too long, it will actually tap me on the wrist to remind me to get up and move. Because a lot of doctors believe that sitting is the new cancer, right? And arguably activity is good for all of us. And so if you haven’t moved within the hour, ten minutes before the hour it’ll tap you. 

And I think one of the biggest surprises people are going to have when they start using it is the breadth of what it will do.

Goldman Sachs Technology and Internet Conference, February 2015

And so with a Bluetooth headset, you can run and listen to your music without your iPhone.

Interview with Charlie Rose, September 2014

You can make a call from the Watch… You can interface with Siri. Siri with this point comes back in a textual mode, but we’d like to do something different with that over time. But it’s cool for all of us, but I think it is going to be profound for some people.

Comments at Berlin Apple Store, reported by 9to5Mac, February 2015

The watch is designed to be able to replace car keys and the clumsy, large fobs that are now used by many vehicles, Cook told The Telegraph.

Reported by The TelegraphFebruary 2015

On accuracy

We set out to make the best watch in the world, one that is precise, it’s synchronized with the universal time standard and it’s accurate within plus or minus 50 milliseconds.

iPhone 6 keynote, September 2014

On needing an iPhone

It requires an iPhone, yes, because they’ve been designed to work together… however, if you go for a run, and you don’t want to carry your iPhone, music is also in your watch.

Interview with Charlie Rose, September 2014

Apple Watch requires the iPhone because it’s been designed to seamlessly work together, like with Handoff where you might read an email on your watch and then respond to it on the iPhone, the email appears right in the lock screen of your iPhone.

iPhone 6 keynote, September 2014

On health and fitness 

apple-watch-self-magazine

So if you’re just someone who wants to be a bit more active, or maybe you just want to track what you’re doing during the day, or perhaps you exercise regularly, or even if you are a very serious athlete, Apple Watch helps you live a better day.

We have two new applications in Apple Watch. The first is the fitness app. The fitness app monitors all of your activity and movement throughout the day. And the second is the workout app. The workout app allows you to set specific goals for specific types of workouts, like cycling or running.

iPhone 6 keynote, September 2014

So this is yet another way to begin to build a comprehensive view of your life, which should empower you to take care of yourself over time, and when you need help, it empowers you to take certain data to your doctor to get help from them.

Interview with Charlie Rose, September 2014

Apple Watch… also includes comprehensive health and fitness apps that can help people lead healthier lives.

Internal memo, September 2014

I use it in the gym constantly to track my activity level, my exercise, how long I’m exercising.

Goldman Sachs Technology and Internet Conference, February 2015

On charging

Photo by Tom Krazit/Gigaom

Photo by Tom Krazit/Gigaom

We’re using inductive charging, it has a magnet and it aligns perfectly to the back of the watch, it is so simple and elegant. 

iPhone 6 keynote, September 2014

We think people are going to use it so much you will end up charging it daily.

Interview at Wall Street Journal conference, October 2014

On how Apple Watch is like the iPod

If you think about the, for those of you can remember, the MP3 industry, before the iPod — we weren’t the first company to make an MP3…. And so I see the smartwatch category very much like that. There are several things that are called “smartwatches” that are shipping, but I’m not sure you could name any. Maybe you could. I’m not sure the audience could name very many. But certainly there’s been none that have changed the way people live their lives.

Goldman Sachs Technology and Internet Conference, February 2015

On apps

Now as we showed you last month, we have been working with selected third-party developers on Apple Watch. Like BMW, like American Airlines, like Starwood, and they’ve created some really unique personal experiences for Apple Watch.

Apple Special Event, October 2014

Developers are hard at work on apps, notifications, and information summaries that we call Glances, all designed specifically for the Watch’s user interface.

My expectations are very high on it. I’m using it every day, and loving it, and I can’t live without it. And so I see that we’re making great progress on the development of it. The number of developers that are writing apps for it are impressive and we’re seeing some incredible innovation coming out there.

Apple Q1 earnings conference call, January 2015

On why it’s not a pair of glasses

We always thought that glasses were not a smart move, from a point of view that people would not really want to wear them. They were intrusive, instead of pushing technology to the background, as we’ve always believed.

 Comments reported by the New Yorker, February 2015

On Apple Watch being Apple’s most personal device ever

Apple Watch is the most personal device Apple has ever created.

iPhone 6 keynote, September 2014

The next chapter for us is about personal devices, about something that’s even more personal than what we had before. And I think the watch is a great place to start that.

Interview with Bloomberg, September 2014

And of course, we unveiled our most personal device ever with Apple Watch.

Internal memo, September 2014

The second new category [after Apple Pay] is Apple Watch, our most personal device ever

Apple Q4 earnings conference call, October 2014

Of course, I am talking about Apple Watch. It’s the most personal device we’ve ever created.

Apple special event, October 2014

In September, we gave a glimpse of the future with Apple Watch, our most personal device ever.

Internal memo, December 2014

Courtesy of Apple

Courtesy of Apple

On early sales and expectations

(Apple Watch revenue will be reported in the same category as Accessories, iPods, Apple TV, and Beats) But for now, in Q1, we’re not shipping any iPhone — excuse me, Apple Watches. And so it seems appropriate to start it that way. It also — to be also straight, is — I’m not very anxious in reporting a lot of numbers on Apple Watch, because of the — and giving a lot of detail on it because our competitors are looking for it. And so aggregating it is helpful from that point of view, as well.

Apple Q4 earnings conference call, October 2014

With things that are new, it’s not like a movie, where you can look at that first weekend and draw the line… What did the iPhone do on the first weekend? You don’t remember. Does it matter?

Interview with Bloomberg, September 2014

On price

Apple Watch starts at only $349.  

iPhone 6 keynote, September 2014

I think $349 is an incredibly low price for the value that we’re delivering.

Interview with Bloomberg, September 2014

 Tim Cook Unveils iPhone 6 and Apple Watch