Crowe: Online Video Will Keep Fiber’s Future Full

Given its proximity to the Broomfield, Colo., headquarters of Level 3, there’s always a good chance that the Silicon Flatirons telecom conference will get a visit from Jim Crowe, Level 3’s CEO. He made the short drive up Hwy. 36 on Monday afternoon for a well-reasoned talk about long-term trends in communications that had several key takeaways, including one that says demand for online video means backbone service providers won’t be going out of business anytime soon.

As one of the bigger communications infrastructure providers, Level 3 knows itself some Internet video — according to Crowe, IP-based video today accounts for between 60 and 70 percent of all the traffic on Level 3’s fiber. Read more over at GigaOM.

Paul Kapustka, former managing editor for GigaOM, now has his own blog at Sidecut Reports.

Crowe: Online Video Will Keep Fiber’s Future Full

Given its proximity to the Broomfield, Colo., headquarters of Level 3, there’s always a good chance that the Silicon Flatirons telecom conference will get a visit from Jim Crowe, Level 3’s CEO. He made the short drive up Hwy. 36 on Monday afternoon for a well-reasoned talk about long-term trends in communications that had several key takeaways, among them:

  • Internet video use is here to stay, and will only increase going forward
  • Bundling services with devices is yesterday’s strategy
  • Legislators and regulators are right to be concerned about the potential for monopolistic practices by AT&T, Verizon and cable companies
  • Net Neutrality violations could be handled better by the FTC than the FCC

Read More about Crowe: Online Video Will Keep Fiber’s Future Full

Essay: The Myth of Infinite Bandwidth

[qi:_newteevee] Back in the late 1990s I was often asked what I thought would happen if Internet bandwidth was infinite — what would that change about the Internet itself? Level 3’s (LVLT) recent decision to slash prices on its content distribution network and rumors of new multi-terabit cables across the Pacific have me wondering if we are actually getting closer to having infinite bandwidth. But when replying to the infinite bandwidth question I was prone to posing a return question — what does infinite bandwidth actually mean? …. Continue Reading