Amazon hones its cloud update process

Remember that planned Xen-related reboot Amazon Web Services warned about last week? Well, things went better than planned, according to an updated blog post Monday.

The company said it was able to perform live updates on 99.9 percent of the affected instances, avoiding the need for a reboot altogether.  Last Thursday, [company]Amazon[/company] had said that it would need to reboot about 10 percent of total AWS instances to address a Xen security issue.

The ability of AWS to perform updates without shutting down and bringing back up compute instances comes as very good news to cloud users. And that’s true whether the technology used was a live migration, hot patching or maybe something else. The net result was the same: workloads were not interrupted.

The Xen-related security issue also affected [company]Rackspace[/company], Linode and [company]IBM[/company] SoftLayer, all of which said they’re doing their own fixes before March 10 when more information is released about the vulnerability.

Beware of vendors bearing sponsored research

VMware used third-party benchmarks to claim that vCHS is less expensive than Amazon Web Services or Microsoft Azure. But really, what would you expect them to show?

Why New IaaS Providers Enter at Their Own Risk

New cloud provider NephoScale announced its presence among IaaS providers earlier this week, touting itself as “an advanced cloud service for serious programmers.” But I’m afraid its message might fall upon deaf ears, as there’s little evidence the world is clamoring for another IaaS cloud. The market is arguably already saturated with choices — from Amazon Web Services to GoGrid to your local web host — and most have been honing their platforms for years. Anyone looking to break into IaaS this late in the game will have to bring a lot more to the table than just VMs.