These places were Instagram’s most photographed locations in 2014

In its annual end-of-year tradition, Instagram has released the places in the world users capture the most with the filter-friendly app. Last year, the big question was “Why is a shopping mall in Thailand Instagram’s most photographed place in 2013?” The answer had more to do with a Thai cultural proclivity towards obsessive photo sharing then it did with the mall itself.

This year the number one location is no surprise to anyone: The Happiest Place on Earth. Disneyland topped the list after coming in third the last two years. Other returning champions include Dodger Stadium (#8 in 2013 and #7 in 2012), Times Square (#2 in 2013), and Thailand’s Siam Paragon shopping mall (#1 in 2013 and #2 in 2012),

New entrants include Gorky Park and Red Square (Moscow, Russia), the Louvre (Paris, France), Madison Square Garden and Yankee Stadium (NYC), and Dubai Mall (Dubai, UAE).

Although international places have appeared in Instagram’s most popular list since its first version in 2011, their dominance in this year’s list suggest that Instagram is scaling beyond America, becoming popular enough in other parts of the world that foreign locations are photographed more than American landmarks like the Bellagio, Disney World, and Central Park (which were #4, #5, and #7 respectively on the 2013 most popular places list, but didn’t make the 2014 cut).

Without further ado, here’s the top ten list of 2014 with some pretty photos to boot.

Top Geotagged Locations of 2014 on Instagram

1. Disneyland, Anaheim, California

http://instagram.com/p/wDfDD7rMTc/

2. Dodger Stadium, Los Angeles, California

http://instagram.com/p/ttxW-BB_0l/

3. Times Square, New York, New York

4. Siam Paragon shopping mall, Bangkok, Thailand

http://instagram.com/p/wEiOeCnMLk/

5. Gorky Park, Moscow, Russia

View this post on Instagram

Friday night at Gorky Park Feel the heart of Moscow

A post shared by moskau1983 (@moskau1983) on

6. Musée du Louvre, Paris, France

View this post on Instagram

Nu dar viena

A post shared by *Irma Straukaite* (@orobalionas) on

7. Red Square, Moscow, Russia

http://instagram.com/p/vtdxwVkghd/

8. Madison Square Garden, New York, New York

http://instagram.com/p/wDPkmZzZww/?modal=true

9. Yankee Stadium, New York, New York:

View this post on Instagram

Blue Sky's for Brown and Maroon

A post shared by Chris Post (@chrismpost) on

10. The Dubai Mall, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

http://instagram.com/p/oIBo5dxA-S/?modal=true

Yandex bets on iPhone to get Russia paying for music

Moscow-based search engine Yandex (s yndx) is hoping to steal a march on international rivals with a new music subscription app for the iPhone (s aapl) — but it’s gambling that users will be ready to stump up cash for the service in a country where paid-for digital music is rare.
With major music services like Spotify and Rdio yet to launch in Russia, Yandex plans to announce the iOS app later on Wednesday, offering users the chance to tap into its Yandex Music service and pay for the right to stream direct to their handsets or iPods.
But while the subscription proposition is fairly common among international services, it’s not the norm everywhere — and that could prove tricky.
Most music services in Russia are free, including the web-based version of Yandex Music, which launched in 2009. In order to take that service mobile, however, the company is asking people to pay 199 roubles each month (around $6) for the right stream a library of music that currently holds more than 3 million tracks by 80,000 artists over the air to their phone.
There are subscription services available locally, including Zvooq.ru, which charges $5 a month for mobile and offline access — but, like Yandex, it still offers a free web player.
Yandex Logo, from handoutYandex, which owns around two-thirds of the Russian search market, is clearly hoping it can covert some of its 5 million monthly web listeners to go the mobile route. But even it can convince them, just 2 percent of Russians use iPhones and — perhaps more importantly — the Russian music market is relatively undeveloped, with total sales across all formats of less than $100 million for 2011.
Turning profit in a market that is heavily reliant on piracy is tough — but could prove a significant bonus for the first company to really crack the problem, as Zvooq’s founders told the Financial Times last year:

“Some people see piracy as a threat, but we see it as a ready market with tens of millions of people consuming music online. It’s an opportunity,” says Simon Dunlop, one half of the duo behind Zvooq.ru, the online music service (whose name reflects Russian zvuk “sound”).
“If you have an established pirate market, it forces you to be that much better because you are competing with the free stuff,” he says.

Still, most potential entrants are steering clear for now. While our map of the worldwide market shows that there are 13 digital music services available locally, most international players have stayed out. Only Deezer and YouTube (s goog) could really be considered global services: Spotify, for example, has no outpost in the region, despite taking a large slice of funding from the Moscow investment group Digital Sky Technologies.

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In a move that echoes Amazon’s purchase of Zappos back in 2009, Russian web store Ozon is buying online shoe seller Sapato.ru — a deal that Ozon CEO Maelle Gavet says will turn it into a “powerhouse online retailer”.

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The extent of corruption in Russia’s technology industry has been revealed by a survey which says as much as 60 percent of payments made are bribes. Is that a stark warning for startups wanting to tap into a lucrative market — or simply the cost of operating?