Google App Engine PHP Runtime now available to everyone

http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.com/2013/10/google-app-engine-php-runtime-now-available-to-everyone.html

Remember when “polyglot PaaS” was the new thing? Five years after launching, App Engine now supports PHP, Python, Java and Google’s own Go programming language. Kidding aside, App Engine actually has matured quite a bit, has attracted some relatively big users and is part of an ever-impressive cloud platform at Google.

What happens if your PaaS passes?

If you build your company’s software on an external platform as a service, what happens when that platform disappears? PHPFog users are finding out. Here’s a cautionary tale.

White House open sources “We the People” petition app

You never know what you’ll find on GitHub. Starting Thursday, you could download the source code to the Obama Administration’s “We The People” online petition application from the open source repository and start adapting it for your petition needs.

Uhuru platform spans .NET, open-source worlds

Uhuru’s AppCloud Ready To Go service targets developers who want to write applications that span the .NET and open source worlds. The PaaS runs atop Cloud Foundry and supports Java, Ruby, PHP, Node.js as well as Microsoft .NET, the company says.

How Tumblr went from wee to webscale

Tumblr hits 500 million page views a day, deals with 40,000 requests per second and sends more than a terabyte of data into its Hadoop cluster. Here’s how it went from nothing to a startup that needed to serve 15 billion page views a month.

Veteran PaaS player Engine Yard claims big momentum

Engine Yard, the popular platform as a service, said its revenue doubled to $28 million and the number of paying customers rose 50 percent to 2,000 in 2011. The company, which started in the Ruby universe, now supports PHP, Node.js and other languages.

Survey: NoSQL adoption driven by schema hate

Database professionals planning to take the NoSQL leap this year said the restrictive schemas in the RDBMS world drove their move. High latency, high cost and inability to scale out were also cited as reasons to move beyond SQL databases.

Jaspersoft parlays Red Hat OpenShift in BI push

The free version of Jaspersoft’s analytics software will be offered as part of Red Hat’s OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service. As Red Hat, Microsoft, Heroku, and Cloud Foundry PaaSes compete, watch for them to add more services and capabilities just as they’ve raced to add language support.