The next big thing for data centers: DC power

Although we live in an AC-dominated world, DC seems poised for a comeback, particularly in data centers. Facebook adopted a DC architecture in its Prineville, Ore., data center. SAP spent $128,000 retrofitting a datacenter at its offices in Palo Alto, Calif., to rely on DC power.

IBM builds memory chips one atom at a time

Computer and memory chips usually tend to get smaller over time, but in a paper published Thursday in Science, IBM details how it’s building memory chips that would be 100 times more dense than today’s hard drives by starting with the smallest building blocks: atoms.

An exercise in galactic-scale energy

Follow physics professor Tom Murphy on an exercise in galactic energy that points out the absurdity that results from the assumption that we can continue growing our consumption of energy forever.

BumpTop Mac is Now Available

For those of you looking for a different desktop experience, BumpTop Mac is now available for public consumption.

Almost four years ago we got a glimpse of the BumpTop prototype, and the application of physics to desktop-based files looked great. Since then, the Windows version has been made available, and the Mac version has been in closed beta (as I’ve mentioned previously). I still like the concept, and it definitely feels like it was made for OS X (versus just a Windows port) which is ideal. To find out more about what BumpTop Mac does, and why (or why not) it may be useful for you, read on.

The good folks at BumpTop brand it as, “Your Mac Desktop, Reinvented,” which I believe is a fair statement. Though I look at it more as what Path Finder did for the Finder — it adds a bunch of features, and makes the standard OS X desktop prettier (in some ways). Read More about BumpTop Mac is Now Available

Surely You’re Joking: Feynman Physics Lectures Online

Outside of my dad, I don’t have a lot of “heroes,” though physicist Richard Feynman comes pretty close. I’m not smart enough to fully grasp everything he did or taught, but I appreciate how the guy never stopped being curious or adventurous and was could master just about anything he put his mind to.

Feynman

If you’re a Feynman fan or just interested in physics (or not), then you should head over to Project Tuva. Created by Microsoft Research, Project Tuva is an interactive video collection of Feynman presenting on various physics topics. Built in Silverlight (naturally), Project Tuva provides not only original Feynman lectures, but also searchable transcripts, note taking and links to external, supporting content.

The site currently collects Feynman’s “Messenger Series” of lectures from 1964, which includes talks on such topics as “Law of Graviation,” “The Distinction of Past and Future,” and “The Relation of Mathematics and Physics.” To call them “talks” makes them sound dull, a word I’ve never heard associated with Mr. Feynman.

It’s not too surprising that Microsoft would put together something like this. Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is a huge Feynman fan, and passion projects like this are what gobs of money are for.

Weekly App Store Roundup: Jan, 24. 2009

nanojudy

Unholster your iPhone and boot up iTunes because it’s that time of the week when we all gather round the App Store and have a look at some of the freshest picks from the last seven days.

While I’ve been wandering the boutiques and bars of Berlin this week, things have been busy for Apple (s aapl). First up was the Q1 conference call where Tim Cook — standing in for Steve Jobs — revealed that the $199 iPhone price point is working well. 

Less pleasing for those in Cupertino was a court ruling that, due to the fact that the first generation iPod Nano is overly susceptible to scratch damage, Apple is going to have to pay up to $25 to owners of the tiny damaged device.

Setting the serious stuff aside, let’s get down to business with this week’s App Store Roundup.

This week, I’ve been looking at iSniper, Slingshot Lite, Fantastic Contraption and Haruzou – Photo Uploader.
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