Businesses Must Get Better at Breach Detection

Information system breaches are bad enough. However, breaches that go undetected prove to be much worse. Take for example Yahoo’s revelation that the company uncovered a data breach that impacted as many as one billion user accounts. While that breach was significant, more significant is that the breach occurred back in august of 2013, and it took years for Yahoo to discover it. Ultimately, the issues surrounding the breach hampered Yahoo’s acquisition by Verizon, resulting in costing  Yahoo some $350 Million.
Unfortunately, Yahoo isn’t alone when it comes to detecting breaches quickly. According to the latest Verizon Data Breach report, dwell time (how long it takes to discover a breach) is averaging more than 200 days. The reasons for that are numerous, ranging from lack of tools, to the lack of technical ability.
Nonetheless, experts agree that something must be done. Faizel Lakhani, president and COO of SS8, a Milpitas, CA based breach detection company, said “despite the best efforts of a barrage of perimeter, network and endpoint security defenses, breaches have continued and will continue to occur.” A statement validated by the company’s 2016 Threat Rewind Report, which shows that the potential for breaches are on the rise and breaches are becoming much more sophisticated.
In Lakhani’s view, it all comes down to improving detection. He said “humans in any organization will make mistakes that allow cyber intrusions. Companies need to accept that reality and develop methods of identifying and counteracting threats.”
To that end, SS8 has introduced technology that they refer to as a Protocol Extraction Engine (PXE), which can be thought of as a deep packet inspection engine which correlates and understands network traffic in real-time. Lakhani added “The idea here is to intelligently automate the detection process to a point where even tunneling or obfuscation techniques can be detected, removing that burden from InfoSec professionals.”
In other words, it seems that SS8 is looking to remove human inefficiencies from the breach detection process. Something that is sorely needed to overcome the more advanced, blended threats that are becoming all too common.  PXE is part of the company’s offerings, which fall under the umbrella of the company’s BreachDetect platform.
BreachDetect is aimed at solving the primary problem facing InfoSec professionals, the ability to gain visibility into the traffic that traverses complex IT infrastructures and application environments, as well as the numerous IoT devices connected to today’s enterprise networks. “The average breach goes undetected for more than 200 days, so it has become essential to understand the full life cycle of an attack, from reconnaissance, to command and control, to data exfiltration. That is the most prudent way to identify the systems and data that have been compromised,” Lakhani told GigaOM. “Obtaining this level of information has been a challenge due to a lack of visibility into network and application activity, and the lack of forensic expertise available to investigate attacks.”
Regardless of what tool an enterprise chooses to use to deal with breach detection, Lakhani’s advice to fully comprehend the full chain of attack and understand the implications of a breach proves valuable to any organization looking to get a handle on breaches.

Kik CEO: “Hey internet are you listening? Messaging has peaked”

It has certainly been an interesting month for messaging apps in the U.S.

Around the same time the New York Times penned its zeitgeist proclamation that messaging apps like Snapchat will become hubs of content and commerce like China’s WeChat, we learned from Comscore that these apps have plateaued in the U.S. in terms of growth. The companies are still attracting new users, but the rate of adoption is slowing in the 18+ crowd.

Right on schedule, Snapchat launched its Discover media feature this week, showcasing content from companies like CNN and Vice in a big departure from its former chatting focused strategy. Was Snapchat leaving messaging behind?

Kik CEO Ted Livingston, one of Snapchat’s biggest messaging competitors in the U.S., has been wondering the same thing. Although the apps is ranked sixth in U.S. social networking apps by iOS download, and 26th in apps overall, Kik is also struggling from a slowdown in growth.

I caught up with Livingston to get his take on what’s happening in the U.S. messaging app world, what he thinks of Snapchat’s Discover tool, and whether a “WeChat of the West” is still possible. What follows has been edited for length, order, and clarity.

Kik just hit 200 million registered users, but the Comscore data showed Kik –and all the other messaging apps — have flatlined in terms of growth. What did you think of that?

I can tell you from Kik’s perspective, we’re not growing as fast in the U.S. as we were in the past. I can tell you it’s not bullshit. We were very relieved to see [the Comscore data]. We were thinking maybe there’s something wrong with just us, but it’s everyone. Hey internet are you listening? Messaging has peaked!

What do you think is happening? Is messaging not actually the future of social media?

App adoption in general is plateauing in the U.S. On top of that smart phone adoption has plateaued in the U.S.

Chat in the West is a commodity. When a 15-year-old kid says, ‘Can we chat on Kik mom?’ Mom is like, ‘No, why would I?’

For us that’s where the [WeChat-like] platform play starts making sense. One you have critical density among youth and you have these non-commodity services on top of chat, teens will bring in everyone else they know. They’ll bring in parents because they need to buy something for them, or a friend because they need them to plan events. The platform may become a ticket to the rest of the demographic.

So that’s where the future growth will come from?

Yes.

How does the plateau impact your plans in the present?

In a world where we are the only one plateauing, then we have the worst strategy. We’ve got to figure out how to keep up with everyone else.

When everyone is plateauing the question is what do we do now?

On that note, what do you think of Snapchat’s Discover? Is this the beginning of its big WeChat play?

Now it’s less about connecting with your friends as following brands. I’m like, ‘Oh shit, they’re just becoming a media company?’

Some have argued that media is just their first step in becoming a portal to other experiences, like gaming or personal budgeting apps.

I would say it’s definitely a step to becoming a platform…a broadcast platform (as opposed to a messaging platform). Snapchat started somewhere in between Kik and Instagram: private broadcast. But with the Stories feature they have gone more and more towards broadcast. So they are now a broadcast tool.

What is the best content to go from a broadcast tool to broadcast platform? To me it’s media. Makes complete sense.

Did you see that coming?

I did not, that’s not what I would’ve done. To me it’s very relieving because it takes some pressure off us. A messenger by itself is extremely difficult to monetize and it always has been in history. On the other side it’s brutally simple to figure out how to monetize a broadcast network like Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and now Snapchat.

Maybe [Snapchat] has a great answer [with Discover] but it takes them further away from being the operating system that WeChat has been.

Snapchat hiring journalists to become its own publisher

Not content to rely on major brands for its new media exploration section, Snapchat is also planning on making its own according to a new report by Digiday.

The company will produce high quality video, images, and text for people to view in the Discover tab. Theoretically, it will provide more content for Snapchat’s advertiser partnerships. Furthermore, it will help the company establish itself as a place to consume content, so it doesn’t just have to rely on its partners creating media specifically for Snapchat. As previously reported, the company is working with CNN, Vice, Buzzfeed, and a whole host of others to help them tailor content for its upcoming Discover section.

The company has been snapping up journalists for the endeavor, which explains why long time social reporter Ellis Hamburger left The Verge for Snapchat in November. According to their LinkedIn profiles, blogger Nicole James, videographer Matt Krautstrunk, Dom Smith, and CJ Smith, former MTV producer Greg Wacks, and even animator Kyle Goodrich will be joining him.

I’m curious to see what they create. Snapchat’s disappearing, finger holding format doesn’t naturally lend itself to media consumption. These people will have to get creative if they want Snapchat to become a second screen.

The recent leaked news of a soured Snapchat deal with Vevo, to create its own record label, also makes more sense now. It suggests that the company will look towards creating its own entertainment content in addition to — perhaps — journalistic. Music videos and comedy sketches are likely to be a better fit for the younger crowd then CNN reports.

Snapchat isn’t the only tech company pursuing a platisher (publisher meets platform) approach. Medium has faced criticism for its similar approach, and as Digiday pointed out Tumblr’s former platisher efforts failed spectacularly in 2013.

Kik’s new hashtags reveal the potential of a chat network

Kik continues to ship new features for its chatting application. Following on the heels of Promoted Chats and its in-app browser comes the hashtag. It’s an easy way to create a group chat and invite people to join it within the Kik app. You send them the hashtag name (like #SFSoccerMoms or #CollegeDebateFriends). When they click it they’re taken to a group chatting page, which allows up to 50 participants.

“It’s a way to let you be whoever you want to be, with whoever wants to talk to you,” Kik CEO Ted Livingston wrote in a blog post announcing it. “It’s a social network on your terms.”

Kik’s group hashtag isn’t news that will particularly excite many people over the age of 25 (Kik’s prime demographic is under that age). But it’s a compelling feature, if only because of what it represents.

Group hashtags offer a rudimentary look of what could constitute a social network focused on “chatting.”

It’s almost a Path-like feature, recreating the intimacy of the Facebook of yore. With a chat cap of 50 people, it keeps conversations to smaller, more contextual groups. You don’t have to worry about sharing the details of your weekend with the world, trying to whitewash it for grandma, while simultaneously entertaining your friends. Instead, you can embody your particular sense of self with each individual group.

Group chatting is nothing new of course, and as a standalone feature, it’s not a company. But in conjunction with Kik’s other features, like individual messaging, promoted chats, and an in-app browser, the group hashtag element has great promise. It allows users to communicate easily, without the hassle of an administrator having to invite select members. It provides the same kind of thematic discovery and social organization that hashtags do on Twitter, for tracking news events, or on Instagram, for exploring similar images.

This is what a social network with a core of texting, instead of a newsfeed, could look like.

Animated Gif showing how Kik's hashtags feature works

Animated Gif showing how Kik’s hashtags feature works

 

 

 

 

 

The next WeChat is hiding in Canada and eyeing the U.S.

Four years since its launch, Kik is positioning itself as America’s version of WeChat, the messaging behemoth of China. It believes it has the right product (text messaging, the old-fashioned kind) and the right audience (almost half of U.S. youth) to become a proper mobile first platform.

New York Times invests in Dutch “iTunes for news” company

Blendle, a Dutch startup that sells access to articles from media outlets in the Netherlands and elsewhere on a per-article basis, has closed a $3.8M Series A funding round led by the New York Times and German media giant Axel Springer