Rdio goes free on the web

Rdio is now letting U.S. listeners use its music subscription service for free — on the web, anyway: The music service announced Thursday that it is allowing users to listen as much as they want on its website. Rdio is monetizing the new free offering through ads, which are sold by its new partner Cumulus. Ad-free listening still costs $10 a month. The announcement comes a day after Spotify announced that it is removing limits to free listening in all of its territories, and less than a week before Beats Music launches its service in the U.S.

Rdio brings its Spotify competitor to 20 more countries

Rdio launched its music subscription service in 20 additional countries late Monday, bringing the total number of countries Rdio is available in now to 51. The new markets include 13 Latin American countries, Israel, South Africa, the Dominican Republic and a few smaller countries in Europe. The expansion could give Rdio a chance to leapfrog Spotify in some of these markets: The bigger competitor is thus far only available in 28 countries.

Rdio taps former Amazon exec Anthony Bay as new CEO

Rdio named Anthony Bay as its new CEO Tuesday. Bay joins the digital music subscription service from Amazon(s amzn), where he was working as Global head of Digital Video. That’s an interesting background, considering that Rdio also is operating a digital video service called Vdio — but for now, Bay seems to be concentrated on Rdio’s music business, as the company’s press release doesn’t mention Vdio with a single word. Of course, it’s not like Rdio won’t keep Bay busy: The company has been trying to catch up with Spotify by partnering with radio network Cumulus to launch free, ad-supported services. But making the numbers work hasn’t been easy for Rdio, which recently laid off a reported 35 employees.