Citus Data open sources tool for scalable, transactional Postgres

Database startup Citus Data has open sourced a tool, called pg_shard, that lets users scale their PostgreSQL deployments across many machines while maintaining performance for operation workloads. As the name suggests, pg_shard is a Postgres extension that evenly distributes, or shards, the database as new machines are added to the cluster.

Earlier this year, Citus developed and open sourced an extension called Cstore that lets users add a columnar data store to their Postgres databases, making them more suitable for interactive analytic queries.

It’s all part of a move to transition Citus Data from being just another analytic database company into a company that’s helping drive advanced uses of Postgres, Co-founder and CEO Umur Cubukcu said. Citus launched in early 2013 promising to let Postgres users use the same SQL to query Hadoop, MongoDB and other NoSQL data stores, but has come to realize that its customers aren’t as excited about those capabilities as they are enamored with Postgres.

[protected-iframe id=”49aa437994cc19939e148f897521bcf2-14960843-6578147″ info=”http://www.indeed.com/trendgraph/jobgraph.png?q=postgresql%2C+mysql&relative=1″ style=”width:540px”]

As Postgres undergoes something of a renaissance among web startups (it’s also the database foundation of PaaS pioneer Heroku and its managed database service), Cubukcu thinks there’s a big opportunity to provide tooling that lets developers take advantage of everything they love about Postgres and not have to worry about whether they’ll outgrow it or bring on another database to handle their analytic workloads.

The NoSQL connectivity is still there, but Cubukcu acknowledges that running analytics on those workloads might be a job best left for the technologies (e.g., Spark) focused on that world of data.

And whether or not pg_shard or Citus Data are the ultimate answer for scale-out Postgres, Cubukcu is definitely onto something when he talks about how the narrative around SQL and scalability has changed over the past few years. His company’s work, along with that of startups such as MemSQL and Tokutek, and open-source projects such as WebScaleSQL and Postgres-XL, have shown that SQL can scale. The tradeoff for developers is no longer relational capabilities for the scale of NoSQL.

Rather, Cubukcu thinks the new tradeoff is between open-source ecosystems and proprietary software as companies try to scale out their relational databases. At least when it comes to Postgres, he said, “Our take is, ‘You don’t have to do this.'”

Is NoSQL less disruptive than we thought and just, well, useful?

If there was a NoSQL storm brewing earlier this decade, Hummer Winblad’s Mitchell Kertzman thinks it has all but died down. People thought NoSQL would blow up the SQL world, he said on this week’s Structure Show, but it might just be a nice complement.

GreenSQL gets $5.9M for database security

GreenSQL, an Israeli-based startup that offers software that secures databases has raised a second round of funding led by Rhodium and Atlantic Capital Partners. The funding will allow the company to expand to the U.S. and build products for NoSQL tools used today.

Is Stonebraker right? Why SQL isn’t the choice du jour for many apps

Two weeks ago, a post quoting Michael Stonebraker, who questioned the relevance of MySQL and Facebook’s use of it, sparked an overwhelmingly negative response. The true state of the database market appears to be that while SQL has its place, ideal uses are fading fast.