Screensharing via IM With YuuGuu

YuuGuu is a little different than the options outlined above, because it allows you to share your screen via instant messenger (IM). It also supports all of the major IM platforms such as Yahoo, MSN, AIM, GTalk and more.

Black Tonic: Present Your Slides Live Online

Portland-based design consultancy Wolverine today launched Black Tonic, a web-based app that helps presenters deliver a presentation to their viewers — live and in real-time. Black Tonic is differentiated from existing services is a few ways:

Skype Screen Sharing Enables Effortless Collaboration

James over at our sister site jkOnTheRun has been trying the latest version of Skype (version 4.1 on Windows (s msft), 2.8 on Mac (s aapl)). This new version includes screen-sharing features that allow you to share your desktop with other Skype users. James tested it out while collaborating on a document editing session with co-writer Kevin and was extremely impressed with its simplicity and the way that it allowed real-time collaboration with very little lag. He says that using it enables “true collaboration; it is just like looking over the host’s shoulder to see what they are doing.”
Earlier today, I had a Skype call with James. Initiating a screen-sharing session during the call was as simple as pressing the “share” button and selecting whether to share the whole screen, or just a portion of it. It worked very well; James was able to see every detail on my screen with minimal lag, even though I am in the UK and he’s in Houston. Here’s a screenshot of my desktop he took during the call:

This new version of Skype provides a very easy (and free) way to share a screen with a colleague for collaboration or tech support. Check out James’ post for more detail.
Note: You might need to go to the Skype web site to grab the latest version; clicking “Check for Updates…” didn’t work for me.
Have you tried Skype screen sharing for collaboration? Let us know how it went in the comments.

Interview: Yuuguu’s CEO Discusses the Launch of Screensharing For Skype Users

Screensharing application Yuuguu is an old favorite of WebWorkerDaily. Today, the company launched support for Skype users, bringing its screensharing expertise to one of the largest communication platforms in the world. We caught up with CEO Anish Kapoor to learn a little about the features announced today and the company’s future plans.

Imran: Could you outline the new features announced in the latest edition of Yuuguu?

Anish: This new edition was all about making it really easy for Skype users to instantly screenshare and collaborate in real time with anyone, on any major IM network, not just Skype. Read More about Interview: Yuuguu’s CEO Discusses the Launch of Screensharing For Skype Users

Mikogo: Cross-Platform Screensharing

mikogoScreensharing applications are one of the essential weapons in the web workers’ arsenal and a popular topic here on WebWorkerDaily; in the past we’ve covered services such as Yuuguu and Oneeko.
The latest to join the fray is Mikogo, a cross-platform (Windows (s msft) & OS X (s aapl)) screensharing solution that’s just launched a new Mac edition with a “remote support” feature, which takes the product from a straightforward web conferencing application to a broader service, offering live support and desktop sharing for remote clients and customers.
As well as conferencing and remote support, Mikogo suggest that screensharing is useful for product demonstrations, webcasts and teaching applications. The technology allows for 10 participants in a session, more than enough for all of these scenarios. Read More about Mikogo: Cross-Platform Screensharing

Weekly App Store Roundup: Feb, 14th. 2009

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Get your spoon and prepare to swallow a whole tub of awesome because we’ve got the freshest picks from the App Store to stuff in your mouth.

Before we get in to the latest releases, I’ve got a couple of interesting picks from the week’s Apple news.

First big thing, file sharing has been activated for MobileMe. Great news for users of the service, although when it comes to sharing files I’m a big fan of Dropbox — it’s packed with features, more so than MobileMe’s option, and integrates with OS X seamlessly.

Next up, Microsoft is joining the high street retail fray. Fresh from Wal Mart, David Porter is now onboard as Microsoft’s Corporate Vice President of Retail Stores.

A potentially profitable suggestion came from JB in TheAppleBlog’s comments: “They could put a McDonald’s inside to attract customers!” If that does happen, I’ll take my Windows Vista with a large cola and a side-serving of disappointment. Only joking, I don’t drink cola.

In this week’s roundup I’ll be looking at Harvest Time Tracker, Room, Kern and Flickit.

Read More about Weekly App Store Roundup: Feb, 14th. 2009

Smartphone developers lining up to support Palm Web OS

palm-pre-browser1One of the most asked questions following the announcement of the Palm Pre running the new Web OS is whether third party developers will be producing apps for the new platform.  Palm made it clear yesterday they are encouraging third party apps to be developed and we are already starting to see smartphone developers announcing Palm versions of their programs.

Handcase, maker of over 300 apps for smartphones has announced they will produce their entire line of programs for the Palm Web OS platform.

“This plan was already being developed, almost a year. With the launch of the new Palm platform, just announced the anticipated launch of the future” explains Ricardo Garay CEO of Handcase.

I expect to hear similar announcements almost immediately from many of the major smartphone developers who will want to jump on the Palm Pre.  Palm has long supported third party developers as the tens of thousands of apps out there for the old Palm OS will attest.

Today at NewTeeVee Live, We Debate the Future of Internet Video

Some two years ago, it started to become clear: The web was going to change the way we consume video. So in December 2006, in order to closely track and monitor the growth of online video, we launched NewTeeVee. Since then, Liz Gannes and Chris Albrecht have developed deep insights into the online video industry. Today the two of them will get on stage for our second NewTeeVee Live conference, where they will talk to dozens of industry experts, insiders, movers and shakers to help guide the conversation around the future of online video.
Some two years ago, it started to become clear: The web was going to change the way we consume video. So in December 2006, in order to closely track and monitor the growth of online video, we launched NewTeeVee. There we have chronicled the massive influx of venture capital investment into literally hundreds of startups — some of whom dream of being the next YouTube, others that hope to come up with the magic potion for video advertising.
In the process, Liz Gannes and Chris Albrecht have developed deep insights into the online video industry. And they have done a great job of separating the noise from the signal. Today the two of them will get on stage for our second NewTeeVee Live conference, where they will talk to dozens of industry experts, insiders, movers and shakers to help guide the conversation around the future of online video. The world of video finds itself in a pretty awkward place – watching videos on the web has become as natural as sending email.
When recovering from my heart attack, I turned to Hulu to provide on-demand fun. Today, I don’t think twice about spending $20 a month on TV shows from Apple’s iTunes store or $10 for a couple of movies from Jaman. My video-watching habits, while extreme, are precisely what is scaring cable companies into taking the self-destructive and short-sighted approach of imposing metered broadband on their customers. Phone companies are following suit.
Meanwhile, the broader economic downturn and subsequent advertising slowdown is threatening the vibrancy of this business I love so much. Layoffs have started to mar the online studios producing eclectic independent content, and a lack of advertising dollars is poised to plunder the meager treasuries of startups that are finding that the VC spigot has run dry.
But just as when you think the (online video) world is coming to an end, you have companies like Netflix, Blockbuster and others introducing devices that marry the web video to the living room experience, and in the process, inventing a whole new dynamic.
Today we will hear from Netflix CEO Reed Hastings, who is going to share his vision of the future, while Sling CEO Blake Krikorian is going to talk about the future of our living room in a fireside chat with yours truly.
The success of Hulu has awakened the Hollywood studio system to the possibilities of online video, among them the riches that don’t need to be taxed by cable companies and other gatekeepers. With that in mind, Jason Killar, CEO of Hulu, is going to be sharing his story.
CSI creator and executive producer of the CSI franchise, Anthony Zuiker, seems to have figured out the magic formula for cross-platform storytelling and he is one of our keynote speakers.
The online video industry is transitioning from being a gangly teenager to a grown-up; what remains unclear is exactly how it will evolve. I’m confident that by the end of the day we will have a better sense of what that will involve, allowing Liz, Chris and I to bring you the stories that will help all of us prepare us for this new future. We hope to see you there.
And if you can’t be present in person, we will be streaming the conference, thanks to the efforts of our partners, Ustream. We will also be posting to NewTeeVee Live’s Twitter stream, and will be live-blogging the conference over on NewTeeVee.

Yuuguu Inside: Screensharing Comes to AIM, ICQ, MSN & Yahoo

It’s been a busy few weeks for the team at online meeting service Yuuguu, with the announcement of Linux and Flash clients as well as support for Google Talk users.
Earlier today the company rounded out its ‘Yuuguu Inside’ strategy by extending its integration of Google Talk buddies to users from AIM, ICQ, MSN and Yahoo’s instant messaging networks, bringing cross-platform and cross-network support to the company’s ‘Yuuniverse’.
With a reach extending into hundreds of millions now, its easier than ever for users of the service to invite participants to a Yuuguu session, though it remains to be seen if removing previous barriers actually makes a difference in adoption of screensharing over face-to-face meetings.
Regardless, Yuuguu remains a useful free tool for web workers and one that now extends a little further.
UPDATE: Yuuguu CEO Anish Kapoor assures me that a bug in the acceptance of .Mac-based AIM screennames will shortly be resolved.

AMD Bridges the Gap Between the PC and TV

As we consume more media online, and the web becomes more central to our lives, it’s only natural to want to bring that content into our living rooms. But while I and a few others will watch movies and shows on a laptop, most people want to watch their media on their TV. And if they can surf the web at the same time, more power to them. For some people, this trifecta of the couch, web surfing and movie-watching on a big screen is their version of heaven. If they have an AMD-powered computer running Windows, then they’re in luck.
I met on Friday with Brent Barry, a PC gaming strategist over at AMD, to get a demo of the AMD Live Explorer software running on a Windows PC and a Sony television. The demo was hardwired, but a consumer could also use a Wii or an Xbox console (both contain AMD chips from the ATI graphics division) to wirelessly send the information from the PC to the console hooked into the television. Since this only works on AMD-powered PCs, most of the market (notably Mac users) are out of luck, but anyone else can download the software for free. It seems similar to the functionality of the ZvBox, but doesn’t require the extra hardware. For a quick tour of the software and why visual computing is becoming so important, check out the video.
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeRg7CHdCLU]