Report: You will start seeing more tweets in your Google searches

Google and Twitter have rekindled their friendship, according to a new report out from Bloomberg. Twitter will grant access to its tweets to Google, which will start displaying them in search results. Bloomberg says we can expect to see this happen in the first half of 2015.

Previously, Google would occasionally surface tweets but it had to trawl Twitter to pull them itself. Now, Twitter will directly feed the information to Google, automating the process. The tweets will display as soon as they’re posted. It’s similar to a partnership Twitter and Google struck between 2009-2011 that eventually ended after Twitter decided not to renew it.

The news comes on the precipice of Twitter’s fourth quarter earnings call tomorrow. The company has been pulling out all the stops to make itself look stronger prior to the call. It announced a host of new products, from new user instant timelines to direct group messaging, it acquired India-based notifications company ZipDial, and unrolled its new external advertising strategy.

This explains why no men were using Pinterest

If you ever wondered why Pinterest took off with women and not men, we have our answer. Friday the company announced it had changed its search filtering options so that men could see results catered to their gender.

In the past, when searching for workouts or clothes their feed would fill with pins targeted to women. Since Pinterest’s early users were women, the application spread virally through that demographic. Naturally the most popular pins and pinners are, as a result, for women or by women.

That shut out men who might also find the technology useful but didn’t like the results they were served. Although some people who identify as men might appreciate a more feminine selection, not all would. Take a look at Pinterest’s screenshot on the difference in genders:

The difference in gender searching on Pinterest. Left: Men ; Right: Women

The difference in gender searching on Pinterest. Left: Men ; Right: Women

The new gender focus will appear as a toggle, allowing women and men to search for items of the opposite gender as well. That could be helpful for anyone with more androgynous taste, or it could serve well for gift shopping purposes.

The attempt to make Pinterest appealing to men comes from the company’s new head of brand, David Rubin, who formerly ran marketing for the ultra dude product Axe body spray. He was brought on in part to achieve that goal, and he started by commissioning Pinterest ad storylines to appeal to men and filling men’s home feeds with male products. Frankly I’m surprised it took the company this long to create gender specific search results — it has been around for over seven years, after all.

With the product announcement Pinterest also revealed new statistics, saying that its number of male signups have grown 73 percent year over year. It’s impressive numbers for the U.S. As we’ve covered, in some other countries, Pinterest has actually had a far easier time recruiting men to the application.

Since it’s a user-generated content site it’s demographics tend to build on themselves. The more women — or motorcycle fans, or cooks, or interior designers — are on the site, the more pin will be created that appeal to them.

To kickstart other groups Pinterest has to woo them with product shifts, and it’s doing just that.

Google fight over Mosley orgy shows censorship creep in Europe

A rich, powerful man won a series of court victories in France and Germany that arguably helped pave the way for Europe’s controversial “right to be forgotten”, which has helped people erase history by scrubbing search engines. Now, that man is pushing a U.K. court to go a step further — and, unfortunately, it sounds like the court will agree.

As the BBC explains, Max Mosley was in the High Court this week demanding that Google be held accountable for images that show him romping with five German-speaking prostitutes in a prolonged S&M orgy in a posh London apartment.

Mosley, who is the former head of F1 racing and the son of a prominent U.K. fascist, already has the right to ask Google to remove specific search results that link to the pictures or videos in question. What he is seeking now is for the court to designate Google as a publisher in its own right, which would make it responsible for finding and deleting any other links that might appear in the future.

The distinction is crucial because a court ruling in Mosley’s favor would transform Google and other search engines from a passive directory into an active censor. It is the difference between asking a newsstand to remove a certain magazine that has an offensive image, versus making the newsstand responsible for ensuring the image never appears in any other publication it sells in the future.

To support his position, Mosley’s lawyers are pointing to a court ruling against the defunct tabloid News of the World, which was forced to pay Mosley £60,000 for defamation and violating his privacy. They say Google is similarly liable for violating a U.K. law known as the Data Protection Act.

Google’s lawyer, meanwhile, is asking the court to throw out the case on two grounds: that Mosley no longer has a privacy right in the images since they have been so widely disseminated, and because the search engine is not a publisher in the first place. As the FT reports:

“Max Mosley remains in the public eye as a campaigner for privacy rights and this has never been forgotten or receded into the past,” [the lawyer] told the court, adding that in legal terms Google was not a publisher of the images.

While the case would be quickly thrown out in a North American court, other news reports suggest Mosley’s argument gained traction with the judge. The Mirror, for instance, quotes the judge in the case as saying “damages may simply not be available” to Mosley, but that an injunction is “much less problematic.”

This distinction will be cold comfort for Google since Mosley, if the judge issues an injunction, will be in a position to seek damages or a contempt of court charge if Google fails to comply with an order not to display or link to the images.

In the bigger picture, Mosley’s latest gambit appears likely to cause Europe’s creeping cloak of internet censorship to expand further. And a U.K. ruling in his favor will also bring about a further fracturing of the internet as a whole, as North Americans see one version of the web — including the Mosley video — while Europeans see a different one punched full of holes.

Google deal with EU regulates search results – report

The details of a long-awaited deal between Google and the EU are finally out. The agreement requires Google to list three competitors in certain types of search listings, and to agree to other, wide-ranging conditions.

Aggregation aggravation

A federal district court in New York last week handed publishers a major victory in a lawsuit brought by the Associated Press against online clipping service Meltwater News. In an unusually sweeping ruling, Judge Denise Cote held that not all uses of copyrighted content in search results automatically qualify as fair use.