How to Optimize the Founder’s Mind

Research shows that your brain function is both broadened and improved by “interdisciplinary exercise.” What does this mean? Be eccentric. Use your brain to think about lots of different things, even things that have nothing to do with one another. This builds new synapses, exercises existing ones, and simply makes you smarter.

OK, you’re thinking, but I’m founding a company. I don’t have time to think about anything other than cash flow and customer acquisition, much less take up new hobbies. But here’s one quick way to do become interdisciplinary: When you read, read stuff that has nothing to do with what your company does. (You can make time to read.)

Life Optimizer had a great post last week that explained three reasons why diversifying your reading is a shortcut to brains-building.

1. Avoid boredom
I don’t know about you, but reading the same topics again and again makes me bored. Even for topics I’m passionate about, I will be more refreshed if I also read other topics once in a while.

2. Arbitrage knowledge
The art of arbitrage is important for living smart, and diversifying your reading allows you to do knowledge arbitrage. Knowledge arbitrage means taking ideas from one field to be applied to another field. If you read only one or two topics, it’s difficult to do that.
3. Cross-pollinate ideas
Continuing the idea of arbitrage, not only can you borrow ideas from other fields, you can also combine ideas from different fields. Often it will give you “original” ideas since nobody has seen such combination before. Of course, you can only cross-pollinate idea if you have different kinds of idea to begin with, and that’s why you should diversify your reading.

It turns out this is a tried and true method, used by some of your business icons — like VC Michael Moritz and Apple founder Steve Jobs. Read More about How to Optimize the Founder’s Mind

9 VCs You’re Gonna Want to Avoid

Editor’s Note: Fundraising is tough. So more and more of you bootstrap as long as you can. But once you get close to $1 million in revenues, VCs will come calling. That’s right: they’ll come to you. Cash flow positive startups remain hard to come by. But you won’t want to talk to all of them, says Found|READ contributor, Larry Chiang. So he offers this list of VC archetypes you’ll definitely want to avoid, just as soon as you hit the $900,000-mark.
1) Mr. Armchair. He’s a Friday afternoon Chairman. He knows exactly what he’d do as board member of facebook, Google, MySpace.,YouTube. Too bad his portfolio company’s don’t get the same enthusiastic coverage.
2) Mr. One-Hit-Wonder. Yes he sold Postage.com for $200 million (and kept $15 million) so if you wanna hear war stories from the ’90s, take this GSB alum’s money.
3) Mr. Spray-n-Pray. He cites being founding CEO as his Operations experience. (Translation: He was a interim CEO for his last venture firm before company/portfolio implosion and subsequent fund implosion. His fund is a catch-all and he tries to participate in every Sequoia backed deal. Read More about 9 VCs You’re Gonna Want to Avoid

That’s Just A Shame

Apple’s been riding high for so long, they had to be knocked-down a peg sooner or later. News from Forbes is that some former Execs from Apple may have forged documents that would effect the stock options pay-out. While Apple is cooperating with the SEC, Steve Jobs has obtained private counsel from that provided by Apple Computer Corporation.

The stock price of Apple shares has tumbled 5% in just one day from this news. Hopefully information released in a couple weeks at MacWorld will bolster the Stocks and bring it back to an upward tilt once again.

Via TUAW

1000 posts and counting…

That was my 1000th post for GigaOM.com. It has taken nearly 14 months to post that many items. Of course it does not include entries from my other microblog, NotreallyIndian. Thanks all for coming back to read my stuff. I hope to keep you informed, amused and mostly bemused.