Violin Memory has a new CEO

Troubled flash storage vendor Violin Memory (s vmem) has a new president and CEO, just months after a lackluster IPO and an ensuing scandal that resulted in the termination of its previous CEO and the departure of multiple executives. The company’s new leader, Kevin DeNuccio, has led infrastructure companies before, mostly in the networking space. He was CEO of a privately held London-based company called Metaswitch Networks, and before that was president and CEO of Redback Networks when Ericsson acquired it in 2006.

Grad students fuse flash and FPGAs for fast data processing

A pair of MIT graduate students is working on an interesting system they think can help speed the process of analyzing data without putting it on expensive DRAM. The project uses a cluster of flash drives to store the data, with each one connected to a field-programmable gate array, or FPGA. The FPGA is really the key because it can perform calculations on the data in place before it’s sent over the network to the main processor. The architecture could potentially underpin a functional interactive database system for budget-conscious, data-heavy fields such as science.

Fusion-io turns NAND into DRAM for developers

Flash-based storage pioneer Fusion-io (s fio) says it has developed a method for extending a system’s memory from DRAM into Fusion-io’s NAND-based storage tier, enabling the possibility of bigger, cheaper in-memory applications than are currently possible.

Flash storage never sleeps

Although the storage world is awaiting an M&A explosion if EMC actually acquires flash startup XtremIO, Violin Memory and Fusion-io are keeping the hits coming in the meantime. Fusion-io is bringing in new software partners, while Violin brought in another $30 million.

If EMC buys XtremIO, the flash war is on

The rumor mill is adamant that storage giant EMC is in serious talks to buy Israeli flash-storage startup XtremIO, a move that could trigger an avalanche of flash acquisitions rivaling the scale-out-file-system feeding frenzy a couple years ago. Here’s who might get bought.

Rackspace gets its OpenStack cloud in order

Customers can now get early access to Rackspace’s OpenStack-based public cloud, slated to come online May 1. The news comes as the OpenStack Spring Conference kicks off in San Francisco. The company also unveiled OpenStack-based Cloud Block Storage and MySQL-based database services.

Today in Green IT: The case for SSDs in data centers

Analysts at IDC have projected that the dollar per gigabyte price barrier for solid state drives should fall by the second half of this year. What does that mean for data centers, where many operators want to bring down energy usage while speeding up web serving?

CloudSigma adds SSDs to its public cloud

Cloud provider CloudSigma has become the first to add solid-state-drive storage to its public cloud computing service. It’s designed to better CloudSigma’s price-performance ratio overall, which will bring in more and bigger customers that want to do things in its cloud that they can’t do elsewhere.