Transparency, privacy becoming necessary in collaboration tools

This month, online collaboration platform Teambox added private elements, offering users various levels of privacy. More than just a response to Google+ Circles, the feature supports modern organizational practices, allowing employees to share limited information with vendors and clients.

6 Considerations When Moving to a Web-based Project Management Tool

Like many web workers, I cut my project management teeth on applications like Microsoft Project (s msft) and OmniGroup OmniPlan — I respect the role of the Gantt chart. However, project management is no longer just the domain of the project manager — it should involve everyone on the team. Web-based project management tools like Basecamp, LiquidPlanner (reviewed by Mike), Team Effect (reviewed by Charles) and Teambox (reviewed by Meryl) democratize project management data and make it available for everyone.

If you’re moving to a web-based project management tool from MS Project, which one of the many available do you choose? Here are some considerations to take into account: Read More about 6 Considerations When Moving to a Web-based Project Management Tool

Teambox: Collaborate Freely with Your Team

Teambox LogoAt first peek, web app Teambox looks like another collaboration tool: it’s a Basecamp rival that facilitates collaboration and notifies team members of additions and changes to your projects. Both come with a simple, user-friendly interface. But Teambox has one bonus; it lets teams create unlimited projects for free. Teambox charges for branding, installing it on your own server and subscribing to maintenance plans.
The dashboard has details of all your current projects. Every project consists of messages (discussion forum), lists (tasks), pages (wiki), people (contacts on the project) and chat. In less than 10 minutes, I created two projects and added content for each. Read More about Teambox: Collaborate Freely with Your Team

Where the White Labels Are: The Imaginary Beast of iPhone Carrier Value-Add

whitelabel

In the recent past, I’ve covered a couple of the different white-label solutions from third-party developers for carriers that offer the iPhone. These offerings are generally meant to correct some oversight on Apple’s (s aapl) part, or answer a perceived desire for some feature on the part of iPhone owners that Apple seems unwilling to offer itself.

For example, there was Mobispine’s MMS workaround, and more recently, JAJAH, which wanted to turn your iPod touch into an iPhone. In both cases, the companies involved weren’t selling individual apps, but rather the chance for interested corporate clients to license their solution, rebrand it, and offer it for sale to individual customers via the App Store. Read More about Where the White Labels Are: The Imaginary Beast of iPhone Carrier Value-Add