Report: 80% of all mobile data is consumed by just 10% of users

Cisco Systems this week offered some insight into just how much mobile data the world is consuming — 2.5 exabytes a month, to be exact – and now a new report from Amdocs sheds a little light on who among those billions of users is consuming the most. Amdocs found that just 10 percent of mobile users are consuming 80 percent of the world’s mobile data traffic.

[company]Amdocs[/company], a telecom equipment maker that specializes in billing and network operations, calls these folks the “Technorati,” and it’s easy to figure out who they are. They’re the consumers sporting not just advanced smartphones and tablets but often multiple connected devices.

Those numbers aren’t simply reflecting a split between wealthy and poor countries. Amdocs’ State of the RAN (industry shorthand for radio access network) reported on 25 million voice and data connections in major cities around the world, all with lots of smartphone usage, and found that power users are often using as much as 10 times more data than the average mobile subscriber. And since the average mobile data user consumed 100 percent more data between 2013 and 2014, Amdocs found, the data growth what for these Technorati is even more amplified.

Amdocs State of the RAN

Amdocs found not just a demographic split in data use, but also a geographic one: 20 percent of cell sites were generating 80 percent of all mobile data traffic. These areas tend to be the urban hot zones where people congregate, but those areas are also increasingly indoors. Amdocs discovered that 80 percent of all data funneled to mobile devices is being consumed indoors, and that means a large portion of it is hitting Wi-Fi, not cellular networks.

So going by Amdoc’s numbers, what we’re seeing is a very stratified network as mobile data takes over – much more stratified than when voice was the dominant mobile service. A handful of people are consuming the vast majority of all data and they’re doing it in very specific locations of the network.

Cisco VNI mobile data consumption

And Amdocs isn’t the only company that’s seeing these trends. Cisco’s Visual Networking Index focused on overall global carrier trends, not just major cities, but it found the top 10 percent of users consumed 65 percent of all traffic. Furthermore, by [company]Cisco[/company]’s calculations the highest 1 percent gobbled up 18 percent of all of the world’s mobile data, with each averaging 15.2 GBs per month. Apparently there are even more elite tiers within the world’s data elite.

The Real-time Web: Sifting Required

pushing rock up hillDespite all the hype and excitement around the real-time web, access to real-time information online is hardly a new phenomenon. That fact stuck with me after talking to Chris Cox, Facebook’s product director, last week at the social networking company’s headquarters. As he noted, “Real time has been around since [the launch of] Technorati,” referring to the blog search engine founded by Dave Sifry in 2002 that aggregates hot stories from across the web. Yet seven years later, we still haven’t figured out how to handle the inundation of real-time information. Read More about The Real-time Web: Sifting Required

Better Blog Search Results

Last week, I shared some tips to help you get more out of Google Blog Search. I prefer Google Blog Search (s goog) for vanity searches, where I want to see every mention across every blog talking about any of my various efforts. I generally use it as my starting point, but for some very broad topics, I just get too much noise and not enough relevancy. When that happens, I have three fallback search engines that allow me to filter out the less popular blogs and focus on ones with more authority.

Technorati Attention Index Ranks Authority of “Non-Blog” Sources

technorati-fav

Technorati has long been known as a source for ranking the authority and influence of bloggers relative to one another. In an effort to maintain its position as a go-to source for online authority ranking, Technorati has now launched The Technorati Attention Index, a list of “mainstream media” sites that bloggers link to most… when they’re not linking to other bloggers, that is.

Technorati’s Jen McLean, in announcing the launch of the Attention Index, writes:

[T]he blogosphere is not self-contained. What about bloggers’ other sources? This is something we’re asked pretty frequently. We know the independence and immediacy of the blogosphere has had a huge impact on mainstream online media. Much is made of the tension between the two – but what we’re seeing is convergence, and a symbiotic relationship. In the most recent State of the Blogosphere study, we asked bloggers about the other media that influence them. Not surprisingly blogs are in the lead at 61%, but this is followed by non-blog web content at 46%. So what is the influence of mainstream media sites in the blogosphere?

The Index, which is to be updated monthly, currently includes the likes of YouTube, MSN, and Yahoo! News near the top of the list, along with The New York Times, BBC News, and CNN.com.

In looking at the Attention Index and thinking about how it is relevant for bloggers and web workers alike, my first thought was: how is an online mainstream media source defined relative to a blog, or social media source for that matter? The Index is telling us that Google (YouTube) (s goog), Microsoft (MSN) (s msft), and Yahoo! (Yahoo! News) (s yhoo) are considered mainstream media sources alongside the more traditional likes of the New York Times, BBC and CNN.

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Microsoft Locks Up The Guild

felicia-dayFelicia Day, creator of web series The Guild, said during her talk at NewTeeVee Live that she had some major sponsorship on news on the way. Looks like it’s a bit more than just that: The Hollywood Reporter writes that Microsoft (s MSFT) has nabbed the exclusive rights to the second season of the series and will show it across the Xbox, MSN and Zune platforms.

Sprint (s S) will sponsor all 12 episodes of the season across the three Microsoft outlets and will have commercials attached as well as product placements within the show.
Day told us earlier this month that she rejected about 25 offers to sponsor the geek-friendly comedy, saying, “For me, an important part of the show is that I retain the rights to the show.” Her deal with the Redmond giant lets her keep the intellectual property rights to The Guild while collecting an up-front fee. This means that should The Guild follow in the footsteps of Sanctuary (another series where the creator held on to the IP) and move to TV, Microsoft won’t participate in any revenues generated from that.
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