Report: Cloud cost control: expense management and auditing for SaaS and beyond

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SaaS
Cloud cost control: expense management and auditing for SaaS and beyond by David S. Linthicum:
Today’s Software as a Service (SaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), and Platform as a Service (PaaS) offerings enable near-instant productivity and capacity. Businesses, however, have little visibility into or control over their cloud solutions’ true cost.
Cloud computing allows lines of business to self-provision tools, often without IT’s knowledge. The result is an increase in localized productivity. But provisioned systems are often redundant, contracts are poorly optimized, and businesses are unable to manage or audit the lifecycle and usage of these services. They also lack the data and clout to negotiate more favorable terms.
Cloud computing may put unprecedented power into the hands of business users, but the processes for centralizing management and auditing distributed resources are not new. The challenges that businesses face today are similar to those telecom expense management faced 10 years ago. Considering telecom’s best practices and tool sets can help us develop methods and techniques that maximize the benefits of the emerging cloud computing space.
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Report: How to deliver a comprehensive big data analytics framework to communication service providers

Our library of 1700 research reports is available only to our subscribers. We occasionally release ones for our larger audience to benefit from. This is one such report. If you would like access to our entire library, please subscribe here. Subscribers will have access to our 2017 editorial calendar, archived reports and video coverage from our 2016 and 2017 events.
Big Data - generic
How to deliver a comprehensive big data analytics framework to communication service providers by William McKnight:
The communications service provider (CSP) industry has undergone a dramatic shift in recent years. The traditional model of competing on subscription plans is no longer an adequate business strategy. Since most internal systems were built with this model in mind, these environments, with non-enriched, non-integrated, and latent data, fit for after-the-fact reporting, are struggling to keep up with the changes.
This research report will explain how CSPs establish a framework for their analytics as well as review the business drivers for telcos and the key benefits that big data analytics provide. It will also address the impact of the business drivers and the advantages of streaming analytics, combined with the ability to harness big data to meet several CSP competitive requirements. It will conclude by summarizing this comprehensive big data analytics framework for CSPs.

To read the full report, click here.

BT agrees to $19B takeover of EE, paving way for close DT relationship

The negotiations are over: pending regulatory approval, BT will get back into the U.K.’s mobile scene in a big way by buying EE from Deutsche Telekom and Orange for £12.5 billion ($19 billion).

This means BT will be able to sell fully-converged bundles of fixed and mobile connectivity, telephony and pay TV services. It will also leave Germany’s Deutsche Telekom as BT’s biggest individual shareholder, and DT’s chief is already talking about the big European national telecoms giants working together more closely in the future.

“The UK’s leading 4G network will now dovetail with the U.K.’s biggest fiber network, helping to create the leading converged communications provider in the U.K.,” BT CEO Gavin Patterson said in a statement. “Consumers and businesses will benefit from new products and services as well as from increased investment and innovation.”

The companies began exclusive talks in December last year after BT said it was interested in buying either EE or O2. After BT and EE went exclusive, Three UK owner Hutchison Whampoa said it was in talks to buy Telefónica’s O2.

If both those deals go through, the U.K. will be left with three network-owning mobile operators, rather than four (the other one is Vodafone). Regulators will need to take this into account, along with the various chunks of spectrum that the companies own — despite only explicitly talking about business services at the time, BT bought 4G spectrum in 2013’s big auction.

It remains to be seen whether Europe’s competition regulators will take an interest, or whether it will be down to the UK Competition and Markets Authority.

EE is the U.K.’s largest mobile carrier, comprising as it does two former carriers, T-Mobile UK and Orange. It has 24.5 million direct mobile customers, 834,000 fixed broadband customers and a bunch more people who use EE mobile services resold under different virtual operator brands. In total, it services 31 million people, or roughly half the country.

The deal will be a cash-share combination, leaving Deutsche Telekom with a 12 percent stake in BT and one non-executive board member, and France’s Orange with a four percent stake.

“The transaction is much more than just the creation of the leading integrated fixed and mobile network operator in Europe’s second largest economy,” DT CEO Tim Höttges said in the statement. “We will be the largest individual shareholder in BT and are laying the foundations for our two companies to be able to work together in the future.”

The curious case of Angela Merkel and her EU data retention ideas

In the wake of last week’s terrorist attacks in Paris, German Chancellor Angela Merkel has called on the European Commission to deliver on its “promise” of a new EU-wide data retention directive to replace the one struck down by the EU’s highest court last year.

Merkel wants to implement this new directive into German law. There’s only one problem: the Commission doesn’t seem to have promised any such thing, at least not in public.

The Court of Justice of the European Union struck down the Data Retention Directive 2006 in April of last year because it was disproportionate and had insufficient safeguards. The directive had mandated that EU countries had to force telecommunications firms to retain metadata about their customers’ communications for between six and 24 months. Even before the CJEU scrapped it, Germany had already stopped implementing it on constitutional grounds.

On Thursday, according to a DPA report, Merkel told German parliamentarians:

Given the cross-party conviction among all interior ministers, both state-level and federal, that we need such minimum retention periods, we should insist that the revision of the directive promised by the EU Commission is quickly completed and then implemented into German law.

That DPA report claims “Brussels is drafting a follow-up that meets the judges’ standards,” but that’s not what the Commission says.

Last month, Netzpolitik reported that new Home Affairs Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos was planning to make such an announcement, and that his department was “now reflecting on the how, rather than the if.” However, after that report came out, the department backtracked, with a spokeswoman saying: “I meant that we are now reflecting on the how to take things forward, rather than if we need a new directive or not.”

Avramopoulos’s predecessor, Cecilia Malmström, had previously said she wouldn’t propose any new data retention directive until the EU’s new data protection rules had been finalized – something that now may not happen before 2016.

An EU source confirmed to me today that the Commission is taking its time evaluating the issues raised by the CJEU ruling, and intends to have an open dialog with the European Parliament, member states, civil society, law enforcement and data protection authorities. Only then will it be able to decide whether there is a need for a new proposal, the source said.

Technically, Merkel could try setting up a new German data protection law without a broader EU directive. However, her own justice minister has firmly rejected the mass surveillance idea, telling German television a few days ago: “With data retention, we also store all data from journalists and restrict freedom of the press. That does not fit together.”

She would also need to somehow make sure that her data retention law didn’t fall foul of the arguments the CJEU used to strike down the EU Data Retention Directive, advice from the EU Legal Service division suggests.

EU digital chief tries to maintain single digital market momentum

European member states may be keen to water down current net neutrality proposals and push back against the centralization of radio spectrum policy in the EU, but new digital single market chief Andrus Ansip isn’t having any of it. In a speech on Monday, he adopted a tough stance on these issues, and on the abolition of roaming fees for those travelling within the EU. Ansip also told the member states to hurry up so the proposals can be become reality.

Ansip told telecoms providers at the GSMA Mobile 360 conference in Brussels that the concept of net neutrality “has to be solid and clearly defined.” Member states are more keen on unenforceable principles that can be interpreted differently in different countries, but Ansip noted that “if 28 countries have 28 different approaches, it makes the market even more fragmented.”

On spectrum, member states are trying to stop the Commission gathering any more powers of coordination. Ansip argued: “The more this natural resource is divided, the less efficient it is. Ideally, EU countries should be working together much more on allocating spectrum. After all, radio waves know no borders. Why should the internet? We don’t need national fragmentation of internet traffic.”

Ansip said roaming fees for travel between EU countries were “an irritant and an anomaly”. He said he “will continue to push for an end to roaming surcharges in Europe” because “they have no place in the telecoms and digital single markets that Europe so badly needs.” Member states want to see “fair use” policies inserted into current legislative proposals for allowing people to use roaming data within their domestic tariffs.

The Council of the EU, representing the member states’ governments, represents the last hurdle in the European legislative process. The debate over the Telecoms Package, proposed by Ansip’s predecessor, Neelie Kroes, is now heading into the new year. Ansip said he hoped an agreement could be reached within months. “Otherwise, I fear that we may lose momentum,” he said.

So far, the Council hasn’t even begun negotiations with the European Parliament over the package, as it must. Ansip pointed out that the Council itself had pushed for a single EU telecoms market, and suggested that the telcos should also be keen to see this creation because would aid cross-border consolidation and allow them to offer services across the EU.

“It is up to those in the market to invest in the necessary infrastructure. However, the market cannot always provide all that is needed. That’s where public authorities have a role to play,” he said. “Firstly, by providing the right and adequate regulatory environment, which we plan to achieve through the Digital Single Market strategy. And secondly, by incentivizing and leveraging more private investment.”

A single telecoms market is of course a necessary base for a single digital market. Beyond what Kroes had already proposed regarding telecoms, Ansip called for simplified rules on online purchases, an end to the geo-blocking of digital services, and the reform of Europe’s copyright rules.

Europe probes Orange-Jazztel merger over competition concerns

The European Commission has launched an investigation into Orange’s proposed takeover of Spain’s Jazztel. France’s Orange already has a Spanish subsidiary, whose connectivity Jazztel resells as a mobile virtual network operator. Jazztel, founded by Fon boss Martin Varsavsky 16 years ago, is more of a fixed-line player, while Orange has both mobile and fixed networks in Spain. The Commission said in a statement that it is worried about the fact that the merger would result in just three nationwide fixed-line communications providers in Spain (the others are Telefónica and Vodafone) and, by reducing competition, allow the ISPs to increase their prices. Orange has proposed commitments to keep things fair, but the Commission doesn’t think they go far enough.

Telco data specialist Guavus gets a new CEO

Guavus, a San Mateo, Calif.-based startup that specializes in analyzing the data coming off carrier networks, has hired former NetApp EVP Manish Goel as CEO. Goel replaces Anukool Lakhina, who founded the company and will stay on board to help drive its technology strategy, among other things. Guavus has raised $87 million in capital and claims some major wireless carriers as customers of its software that helps tie customer data to network activity.

How Facebook plans to make internet.org happen

In a 70-page white paper released Monday, Facebook, Qualcomm and Ericsson tried to connect the app and cloud world with carriers as part of the internet.org effort. Even if this doesn’t bring broadband to all, it’s a necessary conversation.