Uber starts releasing transit data to cities

Following a conflict with New York City over its ride data, Uber has begun giving some of its transit information to Boston in a pilot program. It’s using ZIP codes as the basis for the place-based information, and it’s anonymizing some of the details to protect riders and passengers.

In a blog post, Uber suggested that Boston would serve as a trial for the program before the company expands it to other cities. Uber isn’t handing over any pricing details, but it is giving cities information on every ride’s drop off and pick up ZIP codes, the time of day each occurred, distance and time of each trip, and “technical support” for combing through the data.

As Gigaom’s Derrick Harris noted in a previous post on the company’s data strategy, “Uber certainly appears to see data as an important arrow in its quiver as it fights for legitimacy in cities around the world.” In the past it has hand-selected which data sets to release, publishing a blog post to prove it wasn’t discriminating against low-income riders in Chicago and months later publishing information to argue that Boston should extend its public transit hours.

However, this is the first time the company has agreed to give ongoing data information on key topics to a city government.

New York will be glad to hear it given that its Taxi & Limousine Tribunal recently suspended five out of six Uber bases for not handing over trip data. Uber is still in negotiations with NYC’s Taxi and Limousine Commission over it. Local governments want the information because it helps them plan everything from public transit routes to traffic patterns to emergency response protocols. It also allows regulators to ensure that transportation companies aren’t discriminating against people in certain neighborhoods.

Until now, Uber had resisted giving its data away, citing concerns about trade secrets. Trade secrets could mean a lot of things, but as some have pointed out, Uber was probably worried, in part, about local governments using Uber data to help taxis work more efficiently.

How to get around on New Year’s and maybe avoid surge pricing

As I noted in Gigaom’s 2014 roundup, this has been the year of the Uber. The company has expanded across the globe and convinced investors far and wide to chuck billions of dollars behind it.

Fittingly, 2014 also heralded Uber’s year of disillusionment. As its reach and power grew, all of a sudden people started worrying about Uber, the company: Its culture, its operational systems, its values. Some decided to stop using Uber to protest  its treatment of drivers, its hypothetical threats against journalists, and its flouting of regulations. Others just got pissed about surge pricing.

But there’s a fast approaching day of year where such high-minded moral decisions will be confronted by tough practical problems: New Year’s Eve. If there’s any point in the year where your anti-Uber resolution might crumble, it’s as you battle other determined party-goers on December 31st.

But have hope. Uber may be the oldest, biggest, and most powerful next-generation transportation networking company, but it’s certainly not the only one.

Uber-for-taxis

Yellow taxi sign at night1) Flywheel: Transportation’s best kept secret. It’s an app that works exactly the same as Uber, allowing you to see how far away the closest car is, request it through the app, and watch it creep ever closer to you. Flywheel has partnered with a myriad of cab companies in different cities, so its supply is almost as plentiful as Uber. The demand for the service, however, is far less since many people don’t know about it or haven’t gotten in the habit of using it. Best part: No surge pricing. In San Francisco, it’s actually offering a $10 flat fare for New Years. Cities: San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle

2) Curb: Another taxi app like Flywheel, but with less taxi companies on it in the Bay Area. It’s in far more places in the US than Flywheel though, so if you’re not an SF resident it could be your saving grace. Cities: 60 cities across America, from Orlando, Florida to Tucson, Arizona.

Car parking apps

3) ZIRX: This is a car parking app. Before you freak out at the idea of paying exorbitant New Years parking garage fees, or having to stay sober, hear me out. ZIRX charges $5 an hour and maxes out at $15. Just like with the Uber app, you drop a pin to tell the ZIRX attendant where to pick up your car, so if you want to hop out right in front of your venue in the middle of Union Square, they’ll be there. When you’re ready to go home you can tell them to meet you anywhere, so if you’ve party hopped over to the Marina, no problem and no extra cost to get your car dropped off there. Here’s the real kicker: If you want to get your drink on and can’t drive home? ZIRX only charges $15 for overnight parking. Cities: San Francisco, Seattle, Los Angeles.

4) Luxe: It’s very similar to ZIRX and same pricing, but Luxe doesn’t yet do overnight parking, meaning you’ll either need to stay sober or cough up the $50 overnight parking fee. On the upside, Luxe is the tech industry favorite, beloved by both Wall Street Journal and New York Times reporters, so you’re likely to have a good experience. Cities: San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Uber’s archrivals

A Post-Taxi Population Opts For Ride-sharing

5) Sidecar: The obvious alternatives to Uber are, of course, its arch rivals. I’m in Camp Sidecar, if only because there’s no surge pricing — drivers set their own rates and you can pick from the list. That helps mitigate surge pricing hangover, although if the drivers are smart they’ll probably be bumping up their fare that night. Sidecar, however, has far less cars than Uber or Lyft so it can be hard to nab one when it’s busy. Cities: 10 cities in the States, mostly big urban areas like Boston and Charlotte, North Carolina.

6) Lyft: Lyft is another option, one that’s nearly as reliable as Uber without quite as many ethical problems. But look out for “prime time tips,” Lyft’s version of surge pricing. Cities: Too many to count, but it’s worth noting New York City is in it (unlike most of the other apps on this list). Check here.

The old school choice

7) Public transit: It may not be hip, but on New Years it’s bound to be cheap and reliable. In a lot of cities around the world, public transportation agencies are running transit for free, extending their regular hours, or adding more units to carry people. For the SF goers, BART is running until 3 am on New Years. Since most people in their heels and fancy clothes don’t even think to tap public transit, in some places the buses and subways may well be both free and empty.

Econ 101: Competition lowers broadband costs

Sending traffic over long-haul pipes is much cheaper in most places than connecting back to a local point of presence. TeleGeography looked at the price differences and discovered that the service offering and the competitiveness of the market determine how much more you pay.

Why the iPhone Makes Ditching Your Car a Lot Less Painful

A recent study found that mobile devices and apps can help drastically improve the appeal and usefulness of public and shared transit options, but only if companies and legislators take a cue from some of the good examples already out there.

Nearest Tube iPhone App Makes Directions Real

nearest_tube

How’s your reality? Blasé, run-of-the-mill, so-so? Fear not — an augmented reality is right around the corner, so long as you own an iPhone 3GS. Yes, Android is well ahead of the game in this particular area, but at least one app is already awaiting Apple’s (s aapl) approval that makes use of this exciting, new technology. It’s called Nearest Tube, and it tells you where to find the nearest tube (station) in London.

Now, I’m not in London, and most of you probably aren’t either (though a few of you are), so what’s the big deal? The big deal is that this app shows off what the new iPhone 3GS is really capable of in terms of augmented reality, and also what it specifically isn’t, which may be more important in the long run.

First, the good. According to the developer’s tech demo (see video below), and CNET UK‘s own trial of the software, it works as advertised, displaying a color-coded heads-up display of floating tube station markers with distance and station name superimposed on the live feed from your iPhone’s camera. Laid flat, the iPhone displays arrows pointing to each of London’s tube lines. Read More about Nearest Tube iPhone App Makes Directions Real