Google Fiber and Creating the Next Generation ISP

With its plans to bring gigabit broadband to Kansas City, Google is changing the fate of that city, but it’s also setting out to build a next generation ISP, one designed for the type of world where connectivity is an irrefutable aspect of our lives.

Let’s Keep the Community in Community Broadband

A handful of telco and cable companies and their allies are advancing what some consider the sugarcoated destruction of free-market dynamics and the democratic process by attacking North Carolina’s community broadband networks. This runs counter to the National Broadband Plan and democracy.

Kansas City Gets Gigabit Speeds. What About the Rest of Us?

Kansas City may not be alone in getting gigabit broadband. In Google’s blog today, it said: “We’ll also be looking closely at ways to bring ultra high-speed Internet to other cities across the country.” Sounds like Google isn’t finished yet. And that’s a good thing.

Broadband Speeds Are Faster (And Only Slightly More Expensive)

The average U.S. broadband connection now delivers speeds of 9.54 Mbps down, which is about 2.5 times faster than the 3.8 Mbps that it was back in 2007. Today’s speeds are 34 percent faster and the cost has only risen 4 percent from 2009 to 2010.

ISPs Are Boosting Upstream Speeds, But Where Are the Services?

Stacey's skinny upstream pipeInternet service providers are beginning to focus on upstream speeds as subscribers change their online behavior from consuming web content to producing it. I’ve written how upstream demand is on the rise thanks to online storage services, video uploads and file sharing, but for people to truly pay attention to their upstream speeds, someone needs to build products that get everyday consumers to experience true pipe envy. Read More about ISPs Are Boosting Upstream Speeds, But Where Are the Services?

We Need More Than Video to Drive Upstream Upgrades

Stacey's skinny upstream pipe

Stacey's skinny upstream pipe


Internet Service Providers are beginning to focus on upstream speeds as subscribers change their online behavior from consuming online content to producing it. Upstream demand is on the rise thanks to online storage services, video uploads and yes, file sharing, but for consumers to truly pay attention to their upstream pipes someone needs to build products that get everyday consumers to experience true pipe envy.
Video is boosting upstream data, which is why Cisco (s csco) is so pumped about its purchase of the Flip camera maker Pure Digital (more demand for bandwidth on the upload and download side means Cisco can sell more gear), but what else is out there? These aren’t the dot-com bubble years. Operators won’t invest in upstream capacity unless users want to pay for it.
In a long view article I wrote over at GigaOM Pro (subscription required), I list some services that may get consumers to both demand (and pay for) fatter upstream pipes such as broadband burglar alarms, home telepresence, and medical monitoring, but what will make you upgrade?

The Coming Upstream Revolution. And We Need It

[qi:gigaom_icon_routers] Most consumers pay some attention to their downstream bandwidth speeds, which can affect how quickly iTunes files finish downloading or the quality of movie streaming, but upstream speeds have never been as big of an issue. That’s clearly starting to change as Internet service providers like Verizon (s vz) and Qwest (s q) offer data packages with increased upstream speeds so users can upload information faster. These boosts in speeds are following an increase in uploading activity and could change the landscape for service providers and startups. Read More about The Coming Upstream Revolution. And We Need It