Netflix is reportedly working on a Zelda live action TV show

Netflix is working on a live action TV show based on the popular Nintendo video game Legend of Zelda, according to a Wall Street Journal report that quotes an unnamed source pitching the show as Game of Thrones for a family audience. I suspect that means no red weddings, but lots is still up in the air: Netflix is still looking for a writer for the show, and the Journal cations that Netflix or Nintendo may kill the project altogether before it ever reaches our TVs.

Dailymotion launches Twitch competitor for video game streaming

Paris-based online video platform Dailymotion wants a piece of the video game streaming pie: the company launched a new live streaming service called Dailymotion Games Wednesday. The service basically tries to do what Twitch has been doing so successfully: Offer video gamers a way to live stream their game play so they can attract a big audience for tournaments, review games in front of a live audience or simply show off their skills.

Dailymotion Games is available on the web, as well as via dedicated apps for iOS, Android and for Sony’s PS4.

Dailymotion already sees more than 180 million video views per month for video game content, the company revealed Wednesday, adding that more than 11 million unique visitors tune into video game content every month.

But it’s likely that not just the own metrics prompted Dailymotion to go down this route: Industry leader Twitch not only managed to attract a monthly audience of 60 million video game fans, the site was also acquired for $970 million in cash last summer. Dailymotion on the other hand has had troubles to find an exit: The company was talking about selling to Yahoo two years ago, but French regulators put an end to the sale, balking at the idea that am American company would own more than 50 percent of Dailymotion.

New research suggests deep learning could improve AI in video games

North Carolina State researchers built a deep learning system that was able to predict players’ goals in an open-ended video game nearly 63 percent of time. It’s not perfect and it’s not proof of a gaming revolution, but it’s a big improvement and a good start.