Vimeo finally adds Chromecast support to its iOS app

Better late than never: Vimeo added Chromecast support to its iOS app Friday, allowing users to cast videos straight from an iPad or iPhone to Google’s streaming stick or any Android TV device.

Chromecast-connecting

Chromecast support for Vimeo has been a frequently-requested feature ever since Chromecast launched in summer of 2013. Vimeo acknowledged the delayed response in a blog post Friday, cheekily calling the cast feature “the one you’ve been waiting for.”

A Vimeo spokesperson told me that the company doesn’t have a firm date for bringing casting to its Android app, but added: “It’s a priority for us and coming soon.”

Vimeo partners with Atlantic, CBS to take paid videos everywhere

IAC-owned video service Vimeo took the next step for its Vimeo On Demand platform Thursday: Vimeo’s paid videos are now available on the websites of partners, including The Atlantic, CBS Interactive and The Enthusiast Network. Partners will sell Vimeo videos on their site and in turn get a cut of each sale.

[company]Vimeo[/company] launched its Vimeo on Demand program close to two years ago, and now distributes more than 50,000 titles through it. Consumers can either rent a title for up to 72 hours, or buy it as a DRM-free download. Up until now, Vimeo’s paid titles were only aggregated on the site itself, but anyone could embed single titles anywhere.

With the launch of the Vimeo on Demand publisher network, consumers will also be able to find and purchase curated catalogs of titles directly on The Atlantic’s website, as well as on the CBS interactive sites TVGuide.com, TV.com and Metacritic and on websites run by the Enthusiast Network, which include GrindTV and TransWorld Skateboarding.

However, Vimeo on Demand isn’t the only service trying to cater to indie filmmakers. BitTorrent recently introduced a paywall for its BitTorrent Bundles, and VHX just raised another $5 million for its self-distribution platform.

This post was updated at 8:47am to clarify the relationship between Vimeo and its partners.

Vimeo starts offering 4K downloads, but shies away from streaming

Vimeo-loving video producers can finally put that expensive Red camera to good use: Vimeo is now allowing Pro subscribers to offer 4K downloads of their movies, and anyone who wants to sell their videos through Vimeo’s VOD platform can also offer those paid downloads in 4K to consumers.

However, Vimeo isn’t offering 4K streaming just yet. “It’s pretty early for streaming,” said Andrew Pile, Vimeo CTO, during an interview last week. That’s in part because there are simply not that many devices that stream 4K content out there yet. There is no affordable streaming device capable of 4K playback, and few people have a 4K monitor for their desktop computer. But that could change soon, according to Pile. “The new iMac is gonna be a turning point,” he told me.

So why offer 4K at all if most consumers are simply not ready for the ultra-high resolution yet? Because filmmakers have been shooting in 4K for a while, and some of them have already been uploading 4K content to Vimeo. That’s especially true for artists participating in Vimeo’s VOD store, explained Pile: “A lot of these things are captured on Red cameras.” Up until now, Vimeo has been transcoding 4K downloads to lower resolutions. Now, it’s keeping them intact, and available to download.

4K was supposed to be a big step forward for online video services in 2014, but the roll-out of 4K content has been slow because of technical and business model challenges.

Vimeo CTO renews commitment to add Chromecast support

Good news for Chromecast owners: Vimeo hasn’t given up on the streaming stick, and plans to add cast support to its apps at some point in the future. “It’s gonna come, we just don’t know when,” said Vimeo CTO Andrew Pile during an interview Friday. Pile added that Chromecast support has been frequently requested, but that Vimeo is still trying to figure out how to slot it into its development roadmap, and which platforms to target first. Adding Chromecast support does make a lot of sense for Vimeo: A recent report estimated that the streaming stick accounted for 20 percent of all streaming device sales during the first nine months of this year.

Vimeo lawsuit could decide on legality of lip dub videos

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/record-companies-lawsuit-vimeo-heads-668334

An ongoing legal fight between major record labels and video hoster Vimeo could finally decide whether internet users have the right to record lib dub videos of popular songs, according to the Hollywood Reporter. The lawsuit against Vimeo is heading to appellate review, and one of the issues that is going to be explored there is the legality of lip dubs. Another question raised in a decision this week: Does a video site have knowledge of infringement if some of its employees watch an infringing video?