Amazon hones its cloud update process

Remember that planned Xen-related reboot Amazon Web Services warned about last week? Well, things went better than planned, according to an updated blog post Monday.

The company said it was able to perform live updates on 99.9 percent of the affected instances, avoiding the need for a reboot altogether.  Last Thursday, [company]Amazon[/company] had said that it would need to reboot about 10 percent of total AWS instances to address a Xen security issue.

The ability of AWS to perform updates without shutting down and bringing back up compute instances comes as very good news to cloud users. And that’s true whether the technology used was a live migration, hot patching or maybe something else. The net result was the same: workloads were not interrupted.

The Xen-related security issue also affected [company]Rackspace[/company], Linode and [company]IBM[/company] SoftLayer, all of which said they’re doing their own fixes before March 10 when more information is released about the vulnerability.

Add IBM cloud to the list of reboots to come

The latest Xen hypervisor vulnerabilities are forcing IBM to reboot some customers’ cloud instances between now and March 10. The vendor sent out an alert to affected IBM SoftLayer customers on Friday, the same day Linode alerted its customers.

As reported, [company]Amazon[/company] Web Services and [company]Rackspace[/company] already posted news about the updates on Thursday night.

Per an [company]IBM[/company] notice sent to customers, the company said it was “in the process of scheduling maintenance for patching and rebooting a portion of services that host portal-provisioned virtual server instances, virtual servers hosted on these servers will be offline during the patching and rebooting process.”

As with the other alerts, the maintenance will happen before March 10, when more details of hte underlying Xen vulnerability will be disclosed. IBM promised more information when it becomes available and said it was working to minimize service disruptions.